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The Words of Te Matorohanga


by


D. R. SIMMONS

Who was Te Matorohanga? Te Matorohanga (c. 1800-76), also known as Moihi (or Mohi) Torohanga, was of Ngāti Whakawhena, Ngāti Moe, Ngāi Tukoko and Ngāi Te Angarākau hapū of Ngāi Tahu ki Wairarapa, Ngāti Hikarahui, Ngāti Kaumoana hapū, of Ngāti Kahungunu and Rangitāne.

Heretaunga tradition suggests that he was also known as Te Motu, of Te Whatuiapiti and Ngāti Rangikoianake of Heretaunga. A tohungawhakapapa, a priestly expert, who taught at Te Poho o Hinepae whare wānanga of Wairarapa. Te Poho o Hinepae and Ngā Māhanga whare wānanga at Te Toka a Hinemoko at Te Reinga conducted by Nuku, were the whare wānanga or tribal colleges of learning where he was trained as a child. Te Toka a Hinemoko was the papa kāinga of his mother's people. He may also have entered the Ahuriri whare wānanga, held near Napier (see Matorohanga-Best Ms(51):149-53). A period of four months during the yearly session in winter, was spent as a visiting tohunga in Rāwheoro whare wānanga at Ūawa (Tolaga Bay), the whare wānanga of Te Aitanga, a Hauiti hapū of Ngāti Porou. Rangiuia was the main tohunga. The last session of Rāwheoro was held in 1836 (Ngata 1958:35). 

The Te Hautawa Seminars

In 1865, at Te Hautawa near Masterton, a group of people who were there to clear the bush asked Te Matorohanga to tell them some of the stories of the elders so they could listen and tell their children. Te Matorohanga agreed but said that a house set apart should be found. The house of Terei and Pene on the bank of the Mangarara was offered and accepted. The group at Te Hautawa were Matiaha Te Uraoterangi (also called Matiaha Mokai), Riwai Te Kukutai, Ihaka Whatarau, (also known as Ihaka Te Moe), Pene Te Matohi, Terei Te Kohirangi, John Alfred Jury Te Whatahoro and the wives, Pane Ihaka, Ripeka Ihaka, Kauki, Paranihia Riwai and their children. Te Whatahoro was also known by his earlier names of Tiaki Turi (Jacky Jury) Ngā Karu o Peeti (sic Pēhi) and Tiaki Turi Ngā Karu o Tupakihirangi (JJ the eyes of Pehi-Tupakihirangi) (B54). Pehi Tupakihirangi was the chief who lived with his people for a while at Nukutaurua, Mahia, before returning to Pallisser Bay. Tiaki Turi and his mother Te Aitu o Te Rangi were part of the return (Parsons 1990:214).

The Talks were Written Down

On 5th January, 1865, Moihi Torohanga, Riwai Te Kukutai and H. T. Whatahoro are said to have gone into the house. Te Uraoterangi suggested to Whatahoro that he take a book into the house to write down the talks. When Te Matorohanga saw the books he asked what they were for. When told that they were to write the talks down he said that Te Whatahoro and Riwai Te Kukutai, who had the books, would be writing for years but, more importantly, in olden times the house was closed by karakia to men outside and to those who would desecrate the house; now, because the talks were to be written, the house was open forever. (This information has been taken from manuscript versions and copies of the talks formerly in the possession of Te Whatahoro and now in the Alexander Turnbull Library and University of Auckland library). The then Dominion Museum (now The Museum of New Zealand/Te Papa Tongarewa o Aotearoa) was asked to publish the talks. In 1907 copies of these talks, as approved by an eminent committee of Ngati Kahungunu elders as part of a cultural preservation project initiated by Tamahau Mahupuku, were sent to the museum. One of these books was The Book of Te Matorohanga. This was not published by the museum because, in 1913 and 1915, S. Percy Smith published excerpts from this volume and another by anothertohunga, Nepia Pohuhu, as a two-volume work, The Lore of the Whare Wānanga. A copy made by the Maori Purposes Fund Board of the book of Nepia Pohuhu was subsequently largely published in 1929 in Te Wānanga I and II, the then journal of the New Zealand Maori Purposes Fund Board.

The Source Manuscripts

Until recently, and apart from the copies made at the Dominion Museum, only sections of The Book of Te Matorohanga were available. John Alfred Jury Te Whatahoro, who was present at the talks in 1865, is said by S. Percy Smith to have had some 50 large volumes in his possession in 1910. By 1970, approximately this number of manuscripts had been located but they did not include the originals from which the museum copies were made. A further 96 manuscripts which were also part of Te Whatahoro's collection have now been located. These manuscripts do contain the originals for the copies but also other partial copies and source manuscripts.

SECTION 1

Collecting the Books at Pāpāwai.

On 2nd February, 1899, at Pāpāwai in the Wairarapa, Tamahau Mahupuku called attention to the words of the Hon. James Carroll that the talks of the ancestors should be collected while there were elders still alive who could explain them. Notices were sent out and books written of those talks were brought before a committee set up for the purpose. The meeting was held at Tāmaki-nui-a-rua (Dannevirke) on 15th March, 1907. Many books were brought and read aloud before the subcommittee known as Te Komiti a Tūpai of Te Komiti a Tānenuiarangi. They were agreed as a true and correct record and written down. The book of Moihi Torohanga or Te Matorohanga (154) was one of the books, the book of Nepia Pohuhu (153) was another. Also agreed to were the books of Te Aohau (111), Rihari Hamatua (also 111) and Paratene Te Okawhare (43) (Numbers in brackets refer to Appendix D). The members of the Tūpai subcommittee were Manahi Paewai, Nireaha Tamaki, Tapapa Rautahi, Renata Tohii, Hori Herewini Te Huki, Aperahama Anaru, Kiingi Ngatuere, Matina Tamaiwhakakitea, H. P. Tunuiarangi, Teri Paerata (a minister of the Anglican Church), Te Momo Kingi Te Takou, Ropoama Meihana, Hoani Rangitakaiwaho, H. T. Whatahoro, Niniwa Heremaia, and the people of Te Pooti Riri-kore of Wairarapa.

When passed as correct, the books were stamped with the stamp of the Tānenuiarangi Committee. Two volumes, those of the teachings of Te Matorohanga (154) and that of Nepia Pohuhu (153), were sent to the Dominion Museum in 1911 to be published. Elsdon Best, the ethnologist, set Hare Hongi (H. M. Stowell) to copying the Matorohanga volume but found that he was changing the text to correspond with his own ideas and dialect (Ngāpuhi). Best completed the transcription. This copy is the Best-Matorohanga manuscript now in the Alexander Turnbull Library (51).

The original Tānenuiarangi manuscript volume of the teachings of Te Matorohanga from which the copy made at the museum was made is now in the New Zealand Maori Purposes Fund Board collection in the Alexander Turnbull Library (154). There are in the collection some 117 manuscripts ranging in size from a few pages to hundreds, all of which were or are part of the Te Whatahoro collection. However, the relevant manuscripts for Te Matorohanga number only 10, all of which are copies made at various times and places of material repeated in the Tānenuiarangi volume (154). Te Whatahoro's manuscripts are, without doubt, the main source of that volume.

The Relationships of the Manuscripts to Each Other.

The talks are given as a series of dated lectures which also appear in one of Te Whatahoro's manuscripts in this form (64). This manuscript book is probably the immediate source of the final text, as it contains most of the relevant information in the Tānenuiarangi manuscript text. An earlier version is a manuscript in the Auckland University Library (39). It appears at one time to have been part of the NZMPFB collection, as do the other 10 Whatohoro manuscripts in the library. This manuscript contains 103 pages, but the dating of the talks is lacking, except at the beginning. The final text is 224 pages long and is divided into dated sections. Other early versions are present in the collection. One, in Auckland University (38), is prefaced with a note in Whatahoro's hand of which the following is a translation:

I start writing the talks of Moihi Torohanga in this book on this 15th day of July in the year of Our Lord 1876, at Te Morere, in Te Manihera's potato storehouse. It is being copied by me to preserve it since the first books in which I wrote the talks of the year 1865, on the 2nd January 1865, are falling apart. Therefore all those talks are retained in this book. Those parts in blue pencil [ink pencil] were inserted by me, although they are not relevant to the main matters in the book. But the form of the words was written by me before (trans. B. Biggs).

This manuscript is 103 pages long. However, it may not be the oldest manuscript. Manuscript (64) has a note at the end stating that it was written from three earlier manuscripts between 1896 and 1901. A possible check on the content of the original books written when the talks were being given is provided by (24), which appears to be a copy of the book written by Riwai Te Kukutai. It is in two sections, the second a copy of the first, of 91 and 101 pages, respectively. The contents are: the first nights, the heavenly family, the making of women, Tāne, making plants, Tāne and Hine Tītama, Māui, the death of Tāne [?Māui], genealogy from Toi-nui, the making of the world, the stars of the heavens, Tūmatauenga and Rongomaraeroa, the origin of tohi wai, Tangaroa and fish, greenstone and grindstone, Papauma and the descendants of Hikarahui, the making of men, Rakaihikuroa, Kupe (published by Best in 1927 in JPS 36:276-82), Maiene, genealogy of Kupe and other miscellaneous genealogies. The manuscript also has pages dated to 1864 to begin the first section of traditions, then subsequent dates of 1873, 1867, 1868, 1876, 1877, 1880 in the Miscellaneous section. A Muaupoko genealogy with the Kupe story suggests that the story originates with that tribe, who are related to Rangitāne, Te Kukutai's tribe. The manuscript written in Manihera's potato storehouse in 1876 (38) is 103 pages long and deals with the opening of the sessions, the heavenly family, the nights, the separation of Rangi and Papa, the blessing of Tāne by Rehua, thewharekura, the patupaiarehe, Tāne and Tamaiwaho, the stars, the heavens, Rūaumoko and Whiro, Māui, genealogy by Te Aohau, Nepia Pohuhu and Paora Te Kiri, Kupe and Te Wheke a Muturangi (in pencil with at the end in ink) “Kamutu a Moihi i kōnei” (Moihi ends here). This section does not appear in the Tānenuiarangi manuscript, but it is used by S. P. Smith in volume two of The Lore of the Whare Wānanga (Smith 1915:41-7). Smith received it as a copy by T. W. Downes (7).

The Contents of the Probable Source Manuscript.

The contents of (64) are as follows:

The beginning of Moihi

6/1/65 karakia in the house, the names of the heavens, the apa of the heavens, the separation of Rangi and Papa, the heavenly family and the way they lived,

7/1/65 the plan to separate Rangi and Papa, anger between the children,

8/1/65 they come out, the story of Ngāti Ira of Te Aitanga a Hauiti at Uaroa for Whakarūaumoko, the nights taken by the family coming out,

9/1/65 Mokohuruhuru, quarrel of Whiro and Tāne, Tāne places the posts of heaven,

10/1/65 Moihi's dread about Riwai Kukutai,

12/1/65 the explanation of the words of Tāne to Whiro and the words of Kaupeka, the adze Āwhiorangi is fetched to cut the posts,

13/1/65 the posts are put in position, the karakia a Paia and his lighting a fire to make Rangi float up,

14/1/65 the causes of Whiro's quarrel with Tāne, the family live inside their house and village, Papa is turned down, Tangaroa fights with Whiro, Whiro's quarrels, the lashing of Te Āwhiorangi, Rehua and Tāne, Tāne begins his climb, the pure of Tāne,

17/1/65 Tāne at Tawhiorangi, Tāne arrives at Matingarei,

24/1/65 Tāne returns with the knowledge, Whiro tries to steal the kit, Whiro decides to make war, peace made between Tāne and his elders, war against Whiro,

27/1/65 poutiriao sent, tapu birds, whatukura basket taken by Whiro, the baskets of knowledge,

29/1/65 clouds,

30/1/65 Moihi's anger with Riwai,

7/4/65 the nights of the moon, the heavens climbed by Tāwhaki, Rangi's cloak, the female gods

8/4/65 the kits, whare wānanga, Māori calendar,

15/4/65 the pounga at Hawaiki, Tāne sleeps with Hine Ahuone and Hine Tītama,

17/4/65 the poutirirao, origin of clouds, thunder, lightning, Whakarūaumoko and his descendants,

18/4/65 Māui attacks Hine Tītama in Rarohenga,

20/4/65 Hine Ahuone, Tāne and Hine Ahuone, genealogies of Tāne, Te Paara, Tāwhaki goes to Whaititiri,

23/4/65 genealogies from the gods Rangitamaku, Roiho, Urutengangana, Tūpai, Uenuku,

25/4/65 genealogy Tānenui, Uhenga ariki and Tāneroa and the return from the South Island, Māui genealogies down to the East Coast and Ngāpuhi,

26/4/65 [added in pencil] Kahungunu genealogy, genealogy Paikea, Maramatau by Riwai, Rongopatahi, Makawerau, Maruwhakatipu, quarrel with Riwai,

28/4/65 [added] genealogy Maruwhakatipu,

29/4/65 [added] Te Aumatangi, Hurumaru, Taputerangi and Kahutarangi and the explanation of this woman, Te Hereroa origin of Wairarapa,

2/5/65 [added] genealogy Whatiuatakamarae, Te Kawa a Tāne, Hinewairangi explanation of that woman, story of Tūtāmure, Tamataipunoa and Tauheikura,

5/5/65 [added], genealogy Te Arururumai-rangi, the story of Tamateamoe, [?]genealogy Kupe, genealogy of Rihari Tohi. The lullaby of Niniwakiterangi,

7/5/65 the story of Turoimata who married Rakaihikuroa,

9/5/65 genealogy Nukutaumaroro, sickness of Te Whatahoro, genealogy Tuhaitari, a section of the talks left out about Te Rangparauri placed in the skies, Moihi farewell for his grandchild, reply on Nukutaurua and Paikea, story of Toi te Huatahi, explanation of Kiwa and Hinemoana, genealogy of Te Pou Manihera,

19/5/65 story of Mataora and Niwareka,

20/5/65 explanation of Māuitikitiki a Taranga, of Ruawharo caught in the net, of the origin of men coming from Irihia to Hawaiki, genealogy Te Tutaratai, Tāwhaki, Tāwhaki to Rongokako, Māuitaha, Paikea and Manawatini their descendants and explanation of the wars at Pukenui and Kaiuku, Moihi leaves, he asks for our books to bless them.
Page 379 ends the manuscript and at page 380 is a note that the book of Rihari Te Hamatua starts, and some genealogies follow to page 443

The Stories are Retold, Not Just Copied Out.

It needs to be noted that the topics are more numerous and detailed and that the stories are retold in sometimes quite different language from that of earlier versions. Whatahoro came from an oral tradition where retelling a story following the elements agreed on was usual. His literacy was largely self-taught and, although he is careful to note the sources and origins of his material, his conformity to literary modes and conventions in reproducing and recopying original manuscript is more apparent than real. The Tānenuiarangi volume (154) contains some dating additional to that noted above. The manuscript (154) contains the same material as (64) but told in different words and with some slight rearrangement. Extra details are included, e.g., to bring genealogies down to those present and to some stories.

Smith Contacts Whatahoro

In 1910, through T. W. Downes, S. Percy Smith, the president of the Polynesian Society, became aware of Te Whatahoro's collection and visited Te Whatohoro, who was living at Wanganui. Smith knew of the Tānenuiarangi volumes being copied at the museum, but copied his material: “from the original documents which were lent to me for the purpose, and the whole of them bear the seal of the ‘Tane-nui-a-rangi’ Committee and therefore shew that the matter contained therein has the approval of that body” (Smith 1913:ii). He also had access to the immediate source manuscripts for the Tānenuiarangi volumes (both for Pohuhu (111) and Te Matorohanga (64)) and many others in Whatahoro's collection as well as the actual stamped Tānenuiarangi volumes. That he did consult them is shown by page numbers he noted in the margins of some of his copies, and by the presence of his distinctive Maori shorthand annotations on some of the manuscripts.

The Volumes are Published

In 1913 and 1915 Smith published the two volumes of The Lore of the Whare-Wānanga, said to have been written down in the late 1850s by Te Whatahoro and Apora Te Kumeroa [?] (probably the person who, with Whatahoro, wrote out the Tānenuiarangi volumes in 1907) and which Smith said he later amplified from the original writings of the talks of the priests Te Matorohanga and Nepia Pohuhu in Te Whatahoro's possession and from the approved Tānenuiarangi volume (Smith 1913:i). A comparison made in 1970 between the copies (50, 51, 36, 37) of the Tānenuiarangi volumes then available and The Lore showed that volume 1 was mainly from Pohuhu whereas volume 2 was from non-Tānenuiarangi manuscripts and, moreover, much of it non-Kahungunu manuscripts, in Te Whatahoro's collection (Simmons and Biggs 1970). A further comparison with the manuscripts now available does not alter that conclusion, even though the origin of some of the doubtful accounts can now be traced more clearly.

SECTION II

The Source Manuscripts — Te Whatahoro's Collection

The source manuscripts or copies of them, from which S. Percy Smith compiled the Lore of the Whare Wānanga, are the collection which belonged to H. T. Whatahoro, otherwise known as John Alfred Jury Te Whatahoro. The whole collection, minus the four volumes presented to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints in 1918 by Whatahoro (64, 111, 153, 154), was presented to the New Zealand Maori Purposes Fund Board by T. W. Downes of Wanganui, to whom they had been left by Te Whatahoro. The collection was kept in the office of the secretary of the board who was also Secretary to the Department of Maori Affairs. By 1960 some 27 volumes had been placed for safekeeping in the Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington. There were unsubstantiated reports that other volumes had been sighted. In 1908 T. W. Downes copied one of Whatahoro's volumes and presented it to the Polynesian Society library. He also copied out other material from Whatahoro's books. The Downes manuscripts in the Polynesian Society Library are four in number.

Smith Copies Whatahoro's Manuscripts.

After receiving T. W. Downes' manuscripts, S. P. Smith, contacted Whatahoro and copied direct, or was given copies of, several of Whatahoro's books. Smith's copies include a partial copy of sections of the Book of Te Matorohanga(154). The Smith manuscripts are also in the Polynesian Society Papers, now held in the Alexander Turnbull Library. The manuscripts are copied onto foolscap-size pages with serrated tops or torn out pages of a ledger book originally pinned together but now separated to a large extent and included with the manuscript for the printer of The Lore of the Whare Wānanga (52,53). The six Smith manuscripts indicate that other manuscripts had existed which were not among those placed in the Turnbull before 1960.

Further Manuscripts are Located

A further 12 manuscripts were found in the office of the Ruatoria Dairy Factory, where Apirana Ngata often worked. These are now in the University of Auckland Library. Pasted-on labels and writing identical to that on the Whatahoro manuscripts in the Maori Purposes Fund Board collection leave no doubt that these writings were once part of the Whatahoro collection which Downes had given to the board. The labels seem to be Downes' own system.

Recently, a further collection of New Zealand Maori Purposes Fund Board manuscripts was placed in the Alexander Turnbull Library. These comprise some 97 manuscripts and a series of files. Except for one or two doubtful items, all seem to have been part of the Whatahoro collection given to Downes and presented by him to the board. The two doubtful items seem to have been collected by Downes, but were probably not from Whatahoro.

Te Whatahoro's Collection of 125 Manuscripts

The whole of the John Jury Te Whatahoro collection comprises some 125 volumes ranging in size from a few pages to over 400. The total number of manuscripts relevant to determining the sources of The Lore of the Whare Wāanangaand Whatahoro's information is now 154. The manuscripts located have been assigned a number and are listed in Appendix D of this paper. The copies made of the Tānenuiarangi volumes sent to the museum are numbered (50) and (51). The Maori Purposes Fund Board collection also includes other copies of these volumes, which are numbered (36) and (37).

(36) n.d. Mss-Papers-189-073. 174 pp. 34 x 22.5 cm.
The spine title is: “Kōrero Whare Wānanga to hunga” and the first page is headed “Kōrero o Te Whare Wānanga. 1862,3,4” (Lessons from the House of Knowledge, Vol. 1, 1859, 62, 3, 4.). The second page is headed “Ko te Pukapuka e Kīianei Ko Tāne Nui a Rangi. He mea Hiiri e tauna Komiti” (The Book which is called Tāne-nui-a-rangi. Sealed by that Committee). This is followed by the names of the people contributing to the volume. The third page is headed, “The Saying of the wise men”. Pages 4-7 are essentially identical with Pohuhu 1929:141-3, which is the published version of the Tānenuiarangi volume (153) and Best's copy of the same manuscript (50). These pages have been bound separately into another spine on which is the title above. Pages 8-9 are inserted pages from a ledger book, headed “copy Pāpāwai. 2 Hanuere 1865” and contain the much-repeated (in these manuscripts) story of the beginning of the session of the Whare Wānanga in January 1865. Page 10 is headed “He Kupu Whakamārama mo Runga i te āhua o ngā tātai Kōrero i roto i te Pukapuka nei” (An explanation of the nature of the stories in this book). The rest of the manuscript is numbered 1-162 and appears to be the teachings of Te Matorohanga. It begins “We were at Te Hautawa with Moihi Matorohanga…” (51 and 154). The whole manuscript is in an unknown hand, with headings in the hand of Raumoa Balneavis. The material is close to, but neither identical to, nor covering all the topics in, (51) Stowell and Best's copy of (154). A close comparison with the text in (154) has not been made.

(37) n. d. Mss-Papers-189-074.53pp. 33x21. 2 cm.
The cover is titled “Te Whare Wānanga, Vol. 2 1865.” and is bound into a cardboard cover. The first page is headed “Ngā Kōrero o Te Whare Wānanga, 1865, Lessons from the House of Knowledge”. Further on, a page is titled “Unpublished part of Te Kauwae-Runga and Te Kauawae-Raro-Ngā kōrero tātai o Nehe. A Ngā Tohunga Ruānuku o Te Whare Wānanga o Aotearoa me te Waipounamu o Arapaoa”. The reverse of this page on which the narrative starts is headed, “Notes from Te Whatahoro M. S. S. Jan. 2nd 1865.” The material in this volume appears to be additional to (36) and contains the teachings of Te Matorohanga (51) and (154) although, in some sections, it is closely similar to material in (50). The list of contributors given in the section with Te Matorohanga is: Te Matorohanga, Nepia Pohuhu, Paratene Te Okawhare, Rihari Tohi, Te Manihera, Karauria Te Rehe, Te Aohau—copy of Paora Hamua's book (this, as we shall see, also corresponds with one of the other manuscripts (64) in Whatahoro's collection). The New Zealand Maori Purposes Manuscripts series B, recently passed to the Alexander Turnbull Library,also includes manuscripts (153) and (154).

(153) 1907-fMS-191. 766pp. (546 blank). 39cm. Half-bound in brown calf, brown boards, 39cm. Spine titled “Ancient Māori History”. “Nama 1 Pukapuka whakapapa a Nepia Te Ika Pohuhu, Ngāti Hine Pare” (Number 1 Genealogy book of Nepia Te Ika Pohuhu, Ngāti Hine Pare) This is one of the books lent to the Latter-Day Saints and has Komiti o Tānenuiarangi seals.

(154) 1907-fMS-190. 426pp. 39cm. Half-bound in brown calf, brown boards, 39 cm. 223 pp. Spine titled “Ancient Māori History.” “Ko te kape tēnei o te pukapuka a Moihi te Matorohanga Kua tukua kia Tūpai [Hamilton]. Ko ētahi o ngā kōrero kei te toe ano ki te pukapuka tahito a Moihi”. One of the books lent to the Latter-Day Saints, this is the copy of the book of Te Matorohanga which was sent to Hamilton. Some of the stories remain in the old book of Moihi and has Komiti o Tānenuiarangi seals.

S. Percy Smith's copy of information in (154) has the following preface written by Smith. (1) 1910-1911. Ms-Papers-1187,123,146, 148, pp.134. Smith-Matorohanga; Polynesian Society Papers. Alexander Turnbull Library. The manuscript is headed as follows:

Copied from p.73 et seq. of one of Whatahoro's books on the side of which is written “Ko te kape tēnei o te pukapuka a Moihi te Matorohanga Kua tukua ki a Tūpai [Hamilton]. Ko ētahi o ngā kōrero kei te toe ano ki te pukapuka tahito a Moihi 8 feb. 1865”. Written in Whatahoro's handwriting, all sealed with the seal of Tāne-nui-a-rangi.

The manuscript is also prefixed by the following in Smith's hand:

Note by Elsdon Best. The Matorohanga book was copied here at the Museum [Wellington] as also was Pohuhu's as the Committee of Tāne-nui-a-rangi wished to get it published by the Govt but of course it would be absurd to publish it twice. Stowell commenced the transcription but was stopped because he did not follow the original, but altered it to his own dialect (Ngāpuhi). The Kahungunu form should be preserved. Oct. 1911. Hence it was that I have only copied these sundry notes from Te Matorohanga's book with the intention of explaining Pohuhu's volume for printing. I have obtained from Whatahoro the meaning of most of the obsolete words which are entered in my Dictionary and have been also supplied to Archdeacon Williams for his new Dictionary. S. P. S. Nov 1911. [This note is on the section of the manuscript included in Manuscript-Papers-1187-123.]

This manuscript is a transcript in Smith's hand of part of (154) attributed to Te Matorohanga. Sections of the manuscript have been separated for inclusion in Smith (1913 and 1915) but may be identified by top-right numbering prefixed by “Te M” or “Te M Sundry” on pages with perforated tops torn from a foolscap pad. The note by Elsdon Best is prefixed to (51), the copy made by Stowell and Best at the Museum of the Tānenuiarangi volume (154).

(2) 1910-1911. Ms Papers 1187-146. 62pp. Smith-Pohuhu, Polynesian Society Papers, Alexander Turnbull Library. The title page of this manuscript reads:

Copied from Whatahoro's book marked: No. 1. Pukapuka whakapapa a Nepia Te Ika Pohuhu Ngāti Hine Pare.
He whakapaparanga nō ngā kōrero me ngā mātauranga a ngā tīpuna, ki te hakanga o te rangi, o te whenua, me ngā mea katoa i te rangi, i te whenua, me ō rātau whakapapa. Ko ngā kaumātua nāna ngā kōrero i tēnei pukapuka.

Nepia Pohuhu Wairarapa 1863

Rihari Tohi Wairarapa 1865

Paratene Te Okawhare Wairarapa 1865

Moihi Torohanga Wairarapa 1869.

Te Ohau Wairarapa 1859

Te Waka Te Kawatini Heretaunga 1876

Moihi Ruatapu Tokomaru 1883

Tamahira Waruwarutu Wai Pounamu 1886

Written by Whatahoro Ngā Umutawa Wāhi o Māhi Tāone i te Aperira 1863. (No. 1. Whakapapa book of Nepia Te Ika Pohuhu Ngāti Hine Pare. A genealogical account of of the talks and knowledge of the ancestors, of the separation of heaven and earth, and their genealogies. The elders whose talks are in this book are Nepia Pohuhu of Wairarapa 1863, Rihari Tohi of Wairarapa 1865, Paratene Te Okawhare of Wairarapa 1865, Moihi Torohanga of Wairarapa 1869, Te Ohau of Wairarapa, Te Waka Te Kawatini of Hastings 1876, Mohi Ruatapu of Tokomaru Bay 1883, Tamahira Waruwarutu of the South Island 1886. Written by Whatahoro, Ngā Umutawa, Masterton District in April 1863 [sic]]). 

This note prefaces the Tānenuiarangi volume of Pohuhu (153), which carries the stamp “J. A. Jury, Assessor, Pineside, Wairarapa”, and the Komiti o Tānenuiarangi stamp. It was one of the books given to the Church of Latter-Day Saints. Its companion and original source (111) was also given to the Church at the same time (1918). The preface entries in manuscript (111) are more precisely dated: Nepia Pohuhu 14 May 1863, 2 August 1863, Te Okawhare 25 July, 7 August, 28 August 1863, Te Aohau 1895, and the others are noted as copies from pre-existing books included in the book. We have Smith's word that (1) and (2) were copied from Whatahoro's copies — that is, from (153) and (154) — but Smith also had access to other manuscripts in Whatahoro's collection either directly or from extracts copied out by Downes and Whatahoro and the copies made at the museum of the Tānenuiarangi volumes (50) and (51).

(50) 1911. qMS 1419. 216pp. 35 x 21, 5 cm. Bound in red. Best-Pohuhu: this is Best's transcript of (153) sent by the Tānenuiarangi Committee to Tūpai (A. Hamilton), Director of the Dominiom Museum, Wellington.

(51) 1911. qMS 1352. 210pp. 35 x 21, 5 cm. Bound in red. Best-Matorohanga: this is the transcript by Hare Hongi (also known as Mathew Stowell), (pp. 1-89 typescript) and Best (pp. 90-210 of manuscript) of (154), another Tānenuiarangi volume. In a note Best warns that the first 89 pages are not a strictly accurate copy of the original.

SECTION III

The History of the Text of the Book of Te Matorohanga

The additional New Zealand Maori Purposes Fund Board manuscripts, which have now been passed to the Alexander Turnbull Library as Mss-Papers-0189, include the stamped copies of the Tānenuiarangi manuscripts sent to the Dominion Museum for copying. It is from (153) and (154), (50) and (51) were copied, while (1) and (2) were partly from (111) and (64) which, as we shall see, are probably primary source manuscripts for the Tānenuiarangi volumes. Numbers (36) and (37) were also copied at a later date from (153) and (154).

The Integrity of the Copies Made at the Museum and Later

A detailed textual comparison between the Tānenuiarangi volume (154) and (51)—the Best-Matorohanga manuscript copied by Hare Hongi and Best—reinforces the caution expressed by Best and prefaced to the Best-Matorohanga manuscript (51):“This copy p.1 to p.89 is not quite reliable. the person [Stowell] who copied from the original was not honest. He made some alteration in order to make certain statements agree with his own views, that p.90 on in the ms. is a true copy of the original including word omission etc. E. B.” The first page of teachings, (p.5 of (51)) omits 16 words and substitutes seven new ones, not including changes in verb tenses and participles. This is fairly typical of the Hare Hongi text. Hare Hongi was of Ngāpuhi so a few of the changes could be interpreted as dialectical slips when copying. However, the changes are so numerous that even Elsdon Best despaired of correcting them: he had started but gave up.

The Origin of the Tānenuiarangi Volumes

The Tānenuiarangi Committee of Ngāti Kahungunu met at Pāpāwai in the Wairarapa in 1906 and 1907 (153:5-6). On 15th March, 1907, they met at Tāmaki-nui-a-rua and said, “All the books of the men skilled in genealogies of the divisions of the Māori people have been clearly proclaimed in front of the group of Tūpai, of Tāne-nui-a-rangi.” The preamble continues (51:6):  They were agreed to as an exact and true genealogy, correct and agreed to by that group to be written in this book. The talks and genealogies were spoken aloud in front of the selection committee. They were carefully written in this book, and when finished were carefully agreed to as being correct to be written down in this book, showing also the names of each man whose stories, genealogies, songs, lullabies and incantations, these are now all the talks which are in this book, which are agreed to as being correct, and also the names of all the members of both those groups, are here below. Written in this book by each member are his name, tribe, sub-tribe, and the place he lives. All the talks in this book were spoken and agreement finished before being written in this book. Now begins the writing of the book of Moihi Torohanga, Te Okawhare, Nepia Pohuhu. These are skilful genealogists of Ngāti Kahungunu, Ngāitahu, and Rangitāne.

A Genealogical Book of the Night.

Te Hautawa-place in Wairarapa
2nd of January in the year 1865. Now, Matiaha Te Uraoterangi, Riwai Te Kukutai, Ihaka Whatarau, Pene Te Matohi, Terei Te Kohirangi, asked Moihi Torohanga, to talk of the development of the Māori people down to us, for us to listen. Now Moihi Torohanga agreed and said, put aside a separate house to be a talking place for these stories, and those genealogies of the divisions, down to this division, so that it should not be stepped in by men coming from outside” [Trans D. R. S.].

The original Tānenuiarangi manuscript sealed with the seal (154) was that from which Smith took some sections he included in The Lore of the Whare Wānanga volumes I and II (Smith 1913, 1915). It was one of the four books placed in the library of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints by Whatahoro on 3rd October, 1918 (see Appendix A), and only subsequently recovered and reunited with the other manuscripts now in the New Zealand Maori Purposes Fund Board collection. Apirana Ngata appears to have been the agent in this matter (Letter Mss-Papers-0189-B160).

The Source Manuscripts for the Tānenuiarangi Volume

The Tānenuiarangi manuscript of the teachings of Te Matorohanga purport to be a dated series of talks starting on 5th January, 1865, and concluding on 27th May, 1865. They comprise some 204 pages in Best-Matorohanga (51), of which 89 are typescript. The original from which that copy was made (154) comprises some 223 pages of handwriting. The immediate source for the Tānenuiarangi text appears to be manuscript (64), which consists of some 348 pages and has a calender of talks associated with it. Appendix B is the contents of (64) as compiled by Te Whatahoro. Appendix C lists the contents of manuscript (51) as compiled by Best. A translation also appears in Section 1 of this paper. It will be seen that, although these two are very similar, (64) does not include all the topics of (51) or (154). It seems certain that (64) is the immediate origin of the Tānenuiarangi volume of Te Matorohanga. However, a comparison between the opening lines of (64), (154) and (51) reveals discrepencies. The “speaking aloud” before agreement and writing down could have been a factor which affected the production of the final Tānenuiarangi text, but does not apply to the earlier written text. Consider the first lines of the Best-Matorohanga copy (51).

Te Hautawa, waahi o Wairarapa, Aotearoa, Niu Tireni. Te 2 o Hanuere, i te tau 1865. Te Hautawa, place in Wairarapa, Aotearoa, New Zealand.
Na, ka pātai atu a Matiaha te Uraoterangi, a Riwai te Kukutai, a Ihaka Whatarau, a Pene te Matohi, a Terei te The 2nd of January in the year 1865. Matiaha te Uraoterangi, Riwai te Kukutai, Ihaka Whatarau, Pene TeMatohi and Terei Te Kohirangi asked Moihi Kohirangi, ki a Moihi Torohanga, kia kōrero a ia i ngā kōrero o ngā whakatipuranga o te iwi Māori, tae mai kia rātau, kia rongo atu ai rātau. Na, ka whakaāetia e Moihi Torohanga…. Torohanga to talk about the origins of the Maori people, down to them, that they may listen. This was agreed to by Moihi Torohanga….

This can be compared with (154) which is stamped with the Tānenuiarangi seal.

2 Hanuere 1865
Te Hautawa, wāhi o Pāpāwai o te takiwā o Wairarapa i roto i Aotearoa i te Motu o Niu Tireni. I pātai a Matiaha te Ura oterangi, a Riwai te Kukutai, a Ihaka Whatarau, a Pene te Matohi a Terei te Kohirangi kia Moihi Torohanga kia kōrero ia i ngā kōrero o ngā whakatipuranga o te iwi Māori tae mai kia rātau kia rongo atu rātau. Ka whakaaeatia e Moihi Torohanga i kōnei….

The two are essentially the same, the changes having been made by Hare Hongi in the copying. The beginning of (64), the probable source of the above (154), appears below. The manuscript is stamped with the seal of the “Rongokako Kaunihera”, the Rongokako Council. Rongokako are a tribe in the Gisborne area where Tiaki Turi, later known as Te Whatahoro, lived as a boy.
Moihi Torohanga Moihi Torohanga
Hautawa Hautawa

2 Hanuere 1865 2 January 1865
I te Hautawa nei mātau e noho ana ko Moihi Torohanga, ko Te Ura ko Riwai te Kukutai ko Ihaka Whatarau ko Pene ko Terei ko ahau hoki ko Pane Ihaka ko Ripeka Ihaka ko Kauiki ko Paranihia Riwai me ā rātau tamariki hoki. he tope waeenga te mahi i noho ai i reira. I tēnei Rā tonu ka kīatu a Te Ura kia Moihi, e koro, e kōrero noa ra i ētahi ongā kōrero a ngā kaumātua kia whakarongo noatu mātau ko ō tamariki. We were staying at Te Hautawa, Moihi Torohanga, Te Ura, Riwai Te Kukutai, Ihaka Whatarau, Pene, Terei and me with Pane Ihaka, Ripeka Ihaka, Kauiki, Paranihia Riwai and their children. Clearing land was the reason for being there. One day Te Ura said to Moihi, Oh sir, tell us the stories of the elders so that we may listen for our children.

The Ultimate Sources of the Tänenuiarangi Text

At the end of the text of (64) (64:376), Whatahoro has a note to the effect that he had compiled it from three previously existing books of the teachings of Te Matorohanga. The three, or possibly more, source manuscripts are contained in the New Zealand Maori Purposes Fund Board collection and in the University of Auckland Library and were once almost certainly part of the Te Whatahoro collection in the Maori Purposes Fund Board collection, which became separated and were found in the office of the Ruatoria Dairy Factory, where Apirana Ngata sometimes worked. One of the probable sources is (91).

It begins:

Pāpāwai 2 Hanuere 1865 Pāpāwai 2 January 1865
I noho mātau ko Riwai te Kukutai ko Moihi Te Matorohanga ko Matiaha Mokai, ko Ihaka Whatarau, ko Terei ko Pene ko ahau ko te Whatahoro. Nai tēnei rā tonu ka kī atu a Matiaha Mokai kia te Matorohanga. E koro kōrero noa ra i ētahi kōrero a ngā kau mātua, kia mātau ko a tātau Tamariki; ka roa ka meatu a Riwai te Kukutai, koiano e koro, ko ngā Taringa noa kia rongo atu, ka hoki a atu ai ō taonga kia koe. Ka mea mai a Te Matorohanga, epai ana, engari me whare motuhake mo tēra mahi: koi takahia e te tangata o Waho e te tangata o roto rānei ka mea atu a Riwai te Kukutai, e pai ana kei au he whare, ko te whare o Terei rāua ko Pene i te tahataha o Mangarara ra, he whare mō tātau. ka tonoa a Parinihia e Riwai kia haere kite whakapai i te whare ki te whāriki hoki. I te 5 ongā rā o Hanuere 1865…. We were staying [together]: Riwai te Kukutai, Moihi Te Matorohanga, Matiaha Mokai, Ihaka Whatarau, Terei, Pene and me, Te Whatahoro. Now one day Matiaha Mokai said to Te Matorohanga, “Oh sir. Tell us some of the stories of the elders to us for our children.” After a while Riwai Te Kukutai said, “That's it, sir, our ears are ready to listen and to give your treasures back to you.” Te Matorohanga replied, “That is good but a separate house is needed for that work lest it be trampled in by men from outside or the people from inside. Riwai Te Kukutai then said, “I agree, I have a house. It is the house of Terei and Pene beside the Mangarara which is a house for us. Paranihia was asked by Riwai to go and clean the house to put mats in it as well.” On the 2nd of January 1865….

This manuscript starts with the talks being dated up to 6th January but the practice is discontinued after a few pages. A further manuscript which contains the same date is (103). It starts on 2nd January but, on page 2, is the following:

5 Ongā Rā O Hanuere 1865 5th day of January 1865
Ka noho a Moihi Torohanga a Riwai te Kukutai a Te Whatahoro Ka mea mai a Moihi Hei Pukapuka aha a Kōrua Ka meamai atu ate Whatahoro Hei Tuhituhi iō Kōrero Katoa Kameamai a Moihi Kia Moihi Torohanga, Riwai Te Kukutai and Te Whatahoro were sitting Moihi said, “What do you two have books for?” Whatahoro replied, “To write all your talks.” Moihi said, “How many years te tau mō tēna mahi Riwai te Kukutai E Kore Eroa Katere tonu tāmāu a Tuhi. Ka mea mai a Moihi. Ko te tikanga o tēnei mahi, e whaka ata ana mai a Tamanuiterā i te Pae moana ka tīmata te mahi tae noa ki te Poutūmārōtanga o te Rā. Ka mutu, Ka pēna tonu i ngā rā katoa, haere tātau e kai, e ngāatā, e inu wai tae noa ki te Pou tūmārōtanga o te Rā. Kāti hei te ata tātau tīmata ai te mahi. will you be doing that?” Riwai Te Kukutai, “It will not be long; we write quickly. Moihi said, “The rule for this work: when the sun rises over the sea horizon, the work is started and continues until the sun is at its zenith. It finishes and is like that each day, we go to eat and drink in the dawn then, [not] until midday. Enough in the morning we will start work….”

In (64) the same passage appears at the bottom of the page mumbered 31 — the first page of the text.

I te 5 Hanuere 65 Ka noho mātau a Moihi Torohanga a Riwai te Kukutai ahau a te Whatahoro, ka kite mai a Moihi ia māua Pukapuka, ka ūi mai hei Pukapuka aha ēna. Ka meatu māua hei Pukapuka tuhituhi i ō kōrero kia mau ai ia māua. Ka mea mai a Moihi e kia taka te tau e mahi ana i tēna mahi e oti ai. Riwai kāore ka tere tonu tā mā utuhituhi. Ka mea mai a Moihi kia māu a ko te tikanga o tēnei mahi, e whaka a ta ana mai a Tamanuiterā i te pae moana Ka tīmata te mahi tae noa ki te Poutūmārōtanga o te rā ka mutu, Ka pēra ingā Rā katoa kāore tātau e kai, e inu wai, ingā ata a tae noa ki Te Poutūmārōtanga o te Rā, Hei āpōpō tātau tīmata ai te mahi…. On the 5th of January, '65, we sat down: Moihi Torohanga, Riwai Te Kukutai and me, Te Whatahoro. Moihi saw our books and asked, “What are those books?” We replied, “Books to write your talks for us to keep.” Moihi replied, “How many years will you work at that task before it is finished?” Riwai “No, our writing is fast.” Moihi said to us, “The rule for the work is that, when the sun rises above the sea, that work starts and goes on until noon then stops. It continues like that each day. We do not eat or drink water from the morning until the sun is at its zenith. Tomorrow morning we start work.

The differences between these two manuscripts derive mainly from retelling the same incident in slightly different words and in a more elaborate fashion. Other possible sources for (64) are two of the manuscripts in Auckland University Library. Manuscript (38) has a foreword referring to it being a copy made in Te Manihera's potato house in 1876. The other manuscript (39), which is in seven fasiciles pinned together, is written in lead pencil. The second page of (38) is as follows:

I te 2 Hanuere Tau 1865 ka noho mātau ki te Hautawa. Ko Moihi Torohanga ko Terei, ko Riwai Kukutai, ko Ihakate Moe, ko te Ura, ka meatu ate Ura kia Moihi, E Moi-ka mea ra ka kōrero noa i ētahi kōrero o ngā kau mātua kia mātau, kia whakarongo atu mātau ko ātāuatamariki. Karoa, kameatu a Riwai Koi ano e Koro, ko ngā taringa noa oti kia whakarongo atu, ka hoki atu ai ano kia koe ō taonga. Moihi Torohanga E pai ana, engari me whare kēake i tēnei, Riwai e pai ana kei an te whare pai motu atu ki te whanga. I te 4 Hanuere o taua tau anō ka noho a Moihi a terei ki roto i taua whare a Riwai mā i runga i te tahataha o Mangarara, he whare nō Pene rāu a ko Terei taua whare. I te ata ka mutu te kai, ka kī mai a te Ura kiau kia te Whatahoro, mauria he pukapuka māu Ka tuhi ngā kōrero a tā tuakana papa, a Moihi. Ka tae mai māu a kia Moihi, ka mea mai a Moihi e tā hei pukapuka aha tāu, ka mea atu au hei tuhi o ō kōrero katoa, ka mea mai a Moihi, a kia taka te tau o tēna mahi, ka mea mai a Riwai, e pai ana e koro me tuhutuhi kia mau ai ō kōrero ia māua, e kore e roa ia māua te tuhi. Ka mea mai a Moihi Kāti waiho hei te ata ā pōpō ka tīmata ai a kōrua pukapuka ka mutu te kai ka haere mai. I te 5 Hanuere o taua tau anō, ka mutu te kai, ka tae atu au, ka tīmata te tuhituhi. koia tēnei. Ka — mai a Moihi ki ngā ritenga o tēnei mahi me tūtaki te tatau ka karakia ai i te karakia tuatahi ko tēnei he tuhituhi kāti noa iho. Na ka mea tūai [?] ia tā tātau whakahaere me tīmata i te atatū a poupou noa te rā, Kāti te tuhi kia kai, kau a kōrua hei kai i te ata, ka whaka āe atu māu a mahi ki te tuhi a ka tae ki te poutū o te Rā ka mutu katahi ka kai ai a nōte atarawa o tētahi rangi ka tuhi ai anō pēra tonu amutu noa. Ka tīmata a Moihi i kōnei he karakia….

On the 2nd of January, year 1865, we were staying at Te Hautawa, Moihi Torohanga, Terei, Riwai Kukutai, Ihaka Te Moe, Te Ura. Te Ura said to Moihi, “E Moi, speak and tell some of the stories of the elders to us for us to hear for our children”. After a while Riwai said, “So it is sir, our ears are wide open to listen and to give your treasures back to you.” Moihi Torohanga, “That is good, but a separate house is needed for this.” Riwai, “I have a house which is suitable and cut off by the creek.” On the 4th of January of that year Moihi and Terei were in that house of Riwai and the others on the side of the Mangarara, a house belonging to Pene and Terei. In the morning when food was finished, Te Ura said to me, Te Whatahoro, to take a book to write down the talks of your elder Moihi. We arrived and Moihi said, “Sir what is that book for?” I replied, “To write all your talks.” Moihi said, “How many years [will you be] doing that?” “We will write your talks so that we may keep them. We will not take a long time.” Moihi said, “Enough, leave it until the morning when you may begin your books. When food is finished, we go.” On the 5th of January of that year when food was over, I went and we began the writing. This is it. Moihi [said], “The laws for this work are that the door is shut with karakia [prayer] and it is shut with the first karakia; now this is written that is forever ended.” “Now,” he said, “the procedure is open but let us begin in the early morning and at midday finish the writing and let us eat. You two will not eat in the morning.” We and Riwai agreed. On the 6th our writing, our real work was writing until the sun was at the zenith then we ate. From the morning of that day I wrote and it was the same until the end. Moihi began with akarakia….

Manuscript (39) starts differently, though in recognisable fashion:

I te 2 o ngā rā o Tīhema te tau o tātou Ariki o Ihu Karaiti 1865, ka pātai a Matiaha te Ura oterangi kia Moihi Torohanga, kia kōrero ia i ētahi kōrero a ngā kaumātua, kia whaka rongo noatu mātau; ka mea mai a Moihi Torohanga e pai ana, e ngari, me wharemotu hake ka pai ai. Ka utua e Riwai Kukutai, e pai ana kei au, he whare mō tātau, ko te Whare o Terei o Pene mā i te taha taha o Mangarara ra. Ka meatu a Moihi Torohanga e pai ana. I reira a Matiaha a Riwai Kukutai a Terei a Pene a Ihaka Whatarau ahau a te Whatahoro a Ripeka a Kaukirangi a Pane a Paranihia me a mātau tamariki, me Moihi Torohanga. Ko tā mātau mahi i taua wā he Tope Waerenga i te Hautawa wāhi o Pāpāwai I te 5 ongārā o Hanuere tau 1865, ka uru mātau ki roto ki te Whare o Terei o Pene i te tahataha o Mangarara: Ka mea mai a Moihi Torohanga, hei Pukapuka aha a kōrua Pukapuka. Ka meatu a Riwai te Kukutai hei tuhituhi i ō kōrero: ka mea atu a Riwai kāore, ka tere tā māua tuhituhi i ō kōrero. Ka mea mai a Moihi Torohanga e pai ana. ka mea mai a Moihi, I mua he mea karakia te tūtaki tanga o te Whare Kōrero: me te whakatu wheratanga o taua whare; koi takahia te Whare Kōrero koi takahia te Whare kōrero e te tangata o Waho, o roto rānei. Na ko tēnei, he mea tuhituhi ngā kōrero, kāti noaiho tō tātau Whare kia tuwhera ana. Hei āpōpō tātau ka tīmata ai te whakatuwherai tā tātau whare, ka tīmata i te ata tū, a, kia poutūmārō te Rā ka mutu te kōrero: kāore tātau e kai, e inu, a, mutu noa tēnei mahi. Engari ko tō tātau whare me Pure e au, me kōrua hoki āpōpō. I te 6 ongārāo Hanuere tau 1865. KaTīmata a Moihi Torohanga….

On the second day of December in the year of Our Lord Jesus Christ 1865, Matiaha Te Ura o Terangi asked Moihi Torohanga to tell some of the stories of the elders so that we could hear them. Moihi Torohanga said, “That is good, but a separate house is needed.” Riwai Kukutai replied, “I agree with that, a house for us is that of Terei, Pene and the others on the other side of Mangarara.” Moihi Torohanga said, “That is good.” There were Matiaha, Riwai Te Kukutai, Terei, Pene, Ihaka Whatarau, me, Te Whatahoro, Ripeka, Kaukirangi, Pene, Paranihia, our children and Moihi Torohanga there. Our work at that time was cutting a clearing at Te Hautawa, a place at Pāpāwai. On the 5th day of January 1865, we entered the house of Terei and Pene on the side of the Mangarara. Moihi Torohanga said, “What are your books for?” Riwai Te Kukutai replied, “To write your talks.” Moihi Torohanga asked, “How many years will you be writing?” Riwai replied, “No. Our writing of your talks will be fast.” Moihi Torohanga said, “That is good.” Moihi then said, “In olden times the closing of the House of Talking was by karakia, as was the opening, lest it be trampled over by men from outside or from inside. Now that the talks are to be written, our house is forever open. Tomorrow we begin the opening of our house. We will begin in the early morning, then, when the sun is at its zenith, it will end. We will not eat or drink until it is finished. It will be the same until we have finished the work. But our house will be blessed by me and you two tomorrow. On the 6th day of a January, year 1865, Moihi Torohanga began it….

This manuscript (39) comprises some 91 pages which deal with the heavens, the apa, the children of Rangi and Papa, Whiro, Tāne, Poutiriao, the war in the heavens, the names of Whiro and the eel family.

The Contents of the Possible Source Manuscripts

Manuscript (38) contains 103 pages and deals with the nights, the family of Rangi and Papa, Tāne, Māui, genealogies, Poupakā, Kupe and Te Wheke a Muturangi. On page 100 is the note “Kamutu a Moihi i konā” (Moihi ended there). Some of the material is very similar but none is identical in text to (39). Another similar manuscript (as regards the beginning) is in Wellington. Number (103) contains 114 pages with dates in pencil on the second part which is followed by a partial version of the text in pencil (pp.96-114), whereas pages 1-94 are in ink. The contents are: the nights, the family of Rangi and Papa, Kiwa and Mokohuruhuru, Rehua, the props used to separate Rangi and Papa, the war of the heavenly family, the fairy folk, Tāne in the heavens, the baskets of knowledge, stars, stones, floods, the war in the heavens, Whakaruāmoko, Whiro, and a partial repeat starting at “2 Hanuere 1865 I te Hautawa o Pāpāwai ia mātau ko Riwai Te Kukutai…” (2nd January we were at Te Hautawa of Pāpāwai, with Riwai Te Kukutai…). The front text starts: “5 ongā Rā o Hanuere, 1865 Kanoho a Moihi Torohanga a Riwai te Kukutai a Te whatahoro kamea mai a Moihi, hei Pukapuka aha a kōrua…” (5th day of January 1865 Moihi Torohanga, Riwai Te Kukutai, Te Whatahoro Moihi said, “What are those books you two have?..). A possible check on the contents of the original books is provided by a notebook written by Riwai Te Kukutai (24), whose contents are: the first nights, the heavenly family, the making of people and the search for the female, Tāne, making plants, Tāne, Hineahuone, Hine Tītama, Māui, the death of Māui, the making of the world, the stars of the heavens, Tūmatauenga, origin of tohi wai, Tangaroa and fish, greenstone and grindstone, Papauma, the making of men, Kupe, Ngahue, Hau, Maiene, Turi and miscellaneous genealogies, some coming down to Riwai Te Kukutai.

The Compilation Known as The Book of Te Matorohanga

It will be noticed that none of the possible source manuscripts covers the range of material finally incorporated in the Tānenuiarangi volume.

There would appear, in fact, to be more than one version of the text, indicating that the final text in (64) is derived from pre-existing prototypes which have been drawn upon for the final text. The immediate origins of the Tānenuiarangi manuscript (154) of The Book of Te Matorohanga is (64) but, beyond that point, text becomes sparser. Whatahoro was able to read and write but, like many of his contemporaries, was initially hardly literate in Māori. His writing and general ability in writing improves and develops over time and he notes that he copied out his earlier writings because he considered that they were not well written and that the word divisions were not right. Manuscript (64) has few of these faults and I would suspect the period at which (64) was written was immediately before the 1907 meeting at Papāwai and that the book could have been prepared with that meeting in mind. In the note at the end of (64), referring to it having been copied from three earlier manuscripts, Whatahoro dates the copying as between 1896 and 1900 ((64):378-9).

It should be noted that, except for manuscript (24) by Riwai Te Kukutai, we have only the manuscript in the University of Auckland (39), which may represent material taken down at the talks of 1865. There are fragments but no substantial text. Even (39) is only 91 pages long whereas (154), the Tānenuiarangi volume, contains 223 pages. The process of amplification can be illustrated by taking passages from some of the manuscripts and comparing them. The passages are presented, as are the other extracts quoted through this paper, as near as possible to the way in which they are written, but with the addition of macrons to mark long vowels.

(39) Wairarapa / Pāpāwai I te 5 ongā rā o Hanuere tau 1865.
Ka uru mātau ki roto ki te whare o Terei o Pene i te tahataha o Mangarara; Ka mea mai a Moihi Torohanga, hei Pukapuka aha ā kōrua Pukapuka. Ka meatu a Riwai te Kukutai hei tuhituhi i ō kōrero; kameatu a Moihi Torohanga, a taka te tau e tuhi ana kōrua: ka meatu a Riwai Kāore ka tere tā māua tuhituhi i ō kōrero [76 words].

(103) 5 ongā Rā o Hanuere 1865
Kanoho a Moihi Torohanga a Riwai te Kukutai a te Whatahoro kamea mai a Moihi Hei Pukapuka aha ā Kōrua Ka mea atu ate Whatahoro Hei Tuhituhi iō kōrero Katoa ka mea mai a Moihi kia te tau mō tēnā Mahi Riwai te Kukutai E Kore Eroa katere tonu tāmāua Tuhi [64 words].

(103):96
I te 5 Hanuere 1865 Ka noho a Moihi Torohanga, a Riwai te Kukutai, ahau a te Whatahoro. Ka kite mai a Moihi i ā māua Pukapuka. ka kī mai hei Pukapuka aha ēnā. Ka meatu ahau hei tuhituhi i ō kōrero katoa, ka mea mai a Moihi Ehia taka te tau e tūāhi ana i tēnā mahi oti ai. Riwai Kāore ka tere tonu tā māu a tuhituhi [70 words].

(154) I te 5 Hanuere tau 1865
Ka uru a Moihi Torohanga a Riwai te Kukutai, a H. T. Whatahoro ki roto ki taua whare i kī[i]a ake rā. Ka kite mai a Moihi Torohanga i ā māua pukapuka ko Riwai te Kukutai e mau atu ana i ō māua ringaringa. Ka mea mai a Moihi Torohanga hei pukapuka aha koia. Hei pukapuka tuhituhi i ō kōrero. Ka mea mai a Moihi Torohanga kia taka te tau e tuhi ana kōrua. Ka mea atu a Riwai te Kukutai, Ka tere tā māua tuhituhi i ō kōrero [92 words].

Similar comparisons can be made of the addresses prefacing the manuscripts:

(38) Wairarapa/Pāpāwai;

(68) I Pāpāwai i te Hautawa i te tau o tātou ariki 1865;

(91) Pāpāwai 2 Hanuere 1865;

(64) Te Hautawa 2 Hanuere 1865;

(154) 2 Hanuere 1865 Te Hautawa wāhi o Pāpāwai o te takiwā o Wairarapa i roto i Aotearoa i te Motu o Niu Tireni.

A further very simple manuscript needs to be considered. It is (68), a small, silver-clasped ledger book of 23 double pages, i.e., 46 manuscript pages. The clasp was closed with a lock when received at the Alexander Turnbull Library, where the lock was undone and removed. Here, too, the material corresponds with some of the Tānenuiarangi manuscript. It begins:

(68) I kote tangata nāna ē nei whakapapa i kōrero mai ko Moihi te Matorohanga, he mea tuhituhi i Pāpāwai i te Hautawa i te tau o tō tātau Ariki o Ihu Karaiti 1865 ia Hanuere i te 6 ongā rā ko ngā tāngata nānai tono tau a kaumātua ko Matiahate Uraoterangi ko Ihaka Whatarau Riwai te Kukutai Terei Pene Ka whakāe a te Matorohanga i kōnei kia kōrerotia ngā taonga o roto o te Whare Wānanga, a, I whaāe hoki a Nepia Pohuhu a Paratene Ngatoroirangi, koia tēnei ngā tino kaumātua o roto o ngā Whare Wānanga o ngā māhanga o te Poho o Hine pae, nō Wairarapa ēnei, Nō te rāwhiti ko te Rāwheoro nō Uawa. The man who spoke these genealogies was Moihi Te Matorohanga, which were written at Pāpāwai, at Te Hautawa in the year of Our Lord Jesus Christ 1865 on the 6th day of January. The men who asked that elder were Matiaha Te Uraoterangi, Ihaka Whatarau, Riwai Te Kukutai, Terei, Pene. Te Matorahanga agreed then to speak of the treasures from within the College of Learning. Nepia Pohuhu and Paratene Ngatoroirangi also agreed. These are the real elders from the Colleges of Learning in the Body of Hine Pae, of Ngā Māhanga of Wairarapa, of the East Coast of Te Rāwheoro of Tolaga Bay.

The first section of this manuscript (68) contains the same information on the heavens, the apa, the family of Rangi and Papa, Mokohuruhuru and the separation of the parents as in some of the other manuscripts and the Tänenuiarangi volume (154), but does not include the extra explanatory passages which occur in (154). It may be that (68) and (39) are as close as we may ever get to the original words of Te Matorohanga.

CONCLUSION

The title of this paper is “The Words of te Matorohanga”. As we have seen, what words there were of Te Matorohanga—that is, that were actually spoken—have been lost in the retelling and rewriting which seems to have been the main activity of John Jury Te Whatahoro. One can only admire his energy and dedication. In a previous paper (1970), Bruce Biggs and I looked at the sources of S. Percy Smith's The Lore of the Whare Wānanga with an eye to assessing its use as a traditional document. We found that Volume 1 did more or less correspond with the Tānenuiarangi manuscripts (153) and (154). Volume 2, dealing with the origin traditions, was largely drawn from the other manuscripts in Whatahoro's possession. The extracts from these manuscripts were often incorrectly attributed by S. P. Smith to places, times and even authorities at variance with the information recorded on those manuscripts by Whatahoro. Volume 2, therefore, could neither be regarded as truly representing the body of tradition agreed on by the Tānenuiarangi committee nor as authentic tradition of any tribal area. In this present study, the concentration has been, not on the published text, but on the largely unpublished work, the Book of Te Matorohanga. The earliest text found suggests that the notes from the original talks, if such are still extant, have been amplified to such an extent that they now contain at least four times as much text. The same probably applies to the contents. Many of the stories just do not appear until the later texts become available, e.g., Mataora and Niwareka. The Tānenuiarangi text is as approved by the committee of Tūpai in 1907. As such, it represents an agreed body of tradition accepted as genuine Ngāti Kahungunu tradition in 1907 by a responsible body of elders. It does not represent tribal tradition of 1865. It is important to conclude by emphasising that the Tānenuiarangi Book of Te Matorohanga does not represent the words of Te Matorohanga, though it may be, and probably is, an accurate rendering of his teachings. It can be said to represent Ngāti Kahungunu traditional lore as accepted as such at the beginning of the 20th century.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

My thanks are due to Sharon Dell, Michael Hoare and David Colquohoun at the Alexander Turnbull Library, to the late John Booth, former Secretary of the Polynesian Society, to Bruce Biggs and to the New Zealand Maori Purposes Fund Board for their assistance and helpful criticism.

REFERENCES

Best, E., 1919. The Land of Tara. Polynesian Soc. Reprint. New Plymouth: Avery.

—— 1924a. The Maori. 2 vols. Wellington: Tombs.

—— 1924b. Māori Religion and Mythology. Part 1. Bulletin 10 (reprint 1976). Wellington: Dominion Museum.

—— 1926. The Legend of Māhu and Taewha. Journal of the Polynesian Society, 35:73-110.

—— 1927. Hau and Wairaka. Journal of the Polynesian Society, 36:260-82.

—— 1982. Maori Religion and Mythology. Part 2. Bulletin 11. Wellington: Dominion Museum.

Ngata, A. T., 1958. The Art of Maori Carving. Te A o Hou, 22:30-7, 23:30-4.

Parsons, M. J., 1990. Jury, Hoani Te Whatahoro, in W. H. Oliver (ed.), Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. 1:214-5. Wellington: Allen and Unwin, and the Department of Internal Affairs.
Pohuhu, Nepia Te Ika, 1929-30. Te Whare Wānanga: 1. Te Wānanga, 1:141-260, 2:121-80.

Simmons, D. R., 1976. The Great New Zealand Myth. Wellington: Reed.

—— and B.G.Biggs, 1970. The Sources of “The Lore of the Whare-Wānanga”. Journal of the Polynesian Society, 79:22-42.
Smith, S.P., 1911. The Maori and the Moa. Journal of the Polynesian Society, 20:54-9.

—— 1913 and 1915. The Lore of the Whare-Wānanga Parts 1 and 2. Memoirs of the Polynesian Society, Vol 3 and 4.
Whakatara, T., 1911. Ngati Whatua Traditions. Journal of the Polynesian Society, 20:78-99, 103-15.

APPENDIX A

Labels placed inside covers of (64), one of the books given to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. Similar labels are to be found inside the other three volumes presented at the same time: (111), (153) and (154).
APPENDIX B
CONTENTS OF MANUSCRIPT (64)

Compiled by Te Whatahoro
The manuscript starts at p.31.

31 Tīmatanga a Moihi tau 1865.

32 6 Hanuere tau 1865. te karakia a Moihi i te whare. peeti 32.

34 ongā ingoa ongā rangi 12 peeti 34.

35 te tino atua ongā atua ongā rangi Peeti 34.

35 ngā apa atua p35— ongā rangi (12).

36 te wehenga o Rangi ia Papa p36 maka A.

36 te whānau a Rangi a Papa p36. maka A.

39 Te āhua o tā rātau noho p39 maka E.

40 Ko Uepoto i rere tuatahi ki waho ia Papa.I.P40.

41 Ka mamae a Papa. Ka heke iho a Rehua.

42 Ka hoki a Rēhua a Ruatau kite Toi ongā Rangi.

43 7 Hanuere 65. Ka tino kaha te whaka aro o te whānau a Papa kia wehea ōrātau mātua.

44 Ko ngā mea tēnei i whakaāe kia puta rātau ki waho i te awhi orātau mātua. 28.

45 Ko te riri a Whiro kia Paerangi mō tōna kī e aroha ana ia kia Taane mā. 8 Hanuere 65.

46 Ka tonoa e Uru e Taane a te Paerangi kia haere ki te karanga atu ia Wiro kia puta mai ki Waho nei.

47 Ka puta katoa te whānau a Papa ki waho ināia nei a Rongohuakai mā.

47 ngā kōrero a ngāti Ira a te aitanga Hauiti i Uawa mō Whakarūaumoko.

48 ngā Pō tēnei i takatū ai te whānau a Rangi a Papa, kia puta rātau ki waho.9/1/65

50 Ko Mokohuruhuru tēnei 9 Hanuere 65. me ōna whakamārama.

51 te whakahē a Whiro kia Taane mā mō te rironga mā rātau e wehe ō rātau mātua.

51 Ka tūturu te whakaaro o Taane mā kia wehea ō rātau mātua koia nei rātau ingoa.

52 Ka whakahau a Taane kia Paikea (Paia) kia Uruao kia tikina ngā Toko mō Rangi.

53 Ko te whakapa tēnei a Rangi Parauri rāua ko Hine Kohurau.

55 ka tūturu te haere a Paia mā kite tiki i ngā toko i Ranginaonaoariki.

57 Kātahi a te Papa tahurangi ka horahia te Hei tāwhiri te hei taratahi o Uru i kōnei e Taane, kia mau a Kaupeka.

57 10 Hanuere 65 Ko te moemoea a Moihi Torohanga a Riwai hoki.

57 12 Hanuere 65 te whakamāratanga o ngā kupu a Whiro kia Taane mō te kupu kia mate a Kaupeka.

60 Ka whakahaua kia Patua a Kaupeka i kōnei e Taane.

61 te kawenga o te toki te āwhiorangi kia Kōwhaonui kia Kōwhaoroa hei tope mai i ngā toko mō Rangi.

62 Ka roa a Kōwhaonui a Kōwhaoroa e ngaro ana ka haere a Tamakaka ki Parinui o te Rā kimi ai.

63 Ka riro mai ngā toko nei i kōnei koi tēnei ō rātau Ingoa.

63 13 Hanuere 65 ka whakaārahi a Rangi i kōnei ki ngā toko nei.

65 ka tīmata māua ko Moihi te kōrero e ngaro ana Riwai. koinei te whakapapa o te Rā o te marama.

66 Kote karakia a Paia me te Hikanga i tōna ahi kia rewa ai a Rangi.

69 14 Hanuere 65 Ka whakaatū ria ngā take whakahē a Whiro ia Taane mā.

70 ka noho te whānau nei ki roto i ō rātau whare. me ō rātau kāinga.

70 te taenga mai o Rēhua ki runga o Maunganui ki a Paia kia Taane.

72 Ka huruhia a Papa ki raro ū.

73 Ka tikina e Rongomaraeroa mā te āhua o Wharekura ka mauria iho kia Papa nei tūai.

74 Ka patua e Tangaroa a Whiro Tamaiti a Kewa rāua ko Huruhuru.

75 Ko ngā take kino a Whiro ki ōna taina katoa ēnei.

76 Whakamārama i ngā Kakau toki ngā Pare arai maramara ngā aho hohou o te āwhiorangi o te Whironui.

77 te Whiriwhiritanga i tētahi o te whānau a Papa hei kake i ngārangi tūhāhā.W.

78 te Whakamahara a Moihi mō āna kōrero mā Nepia mā Paratene e whaka tikatika. kei te 79 te toenga.

80 te kupu a Taane kia Rēhua mā māna e kake ngārangi tūhāhā māte ara tiatia mā te ara ururangi.

81 Ka Tīmata a Taane te kake mā te ara Ururangi kite Toi o ngārangi.

82 Ko te whānau tēnei a Hurutearangi rāua ko Tonganui kaea nāna a Taane i Kawe kite Toi ongārangi.

83 Ko te whakamāramatamga i ngā toko e 4 nei.P.

84 Kote wāhi o te Kakenga ra o Taane tēnei ki te Toi ongārangi, i raro mai ai te wānanga ia ia.R.

87 te Pātai a Terei kia Moihi mō te Patupaiarehe T.

87 Ko te karakia a Kautu i roto i Taururangi Pure ia Taane. Me te kakenga ana ki te Toi ongā Rangi.

90 te āhua o e whānau a Hurutearangi i te ao nei āwhioawhio.

90 te Whaiwhaitanga a Tini o Poto mā ia Taane kia Haraua e rātau. 17 Hanuere 65.

91 Ka tono a Io te Hihiri kia Ruatau mā kia tikina tōna a Tawhirirangi, kei te Haruru ongā Puhi o Tiritiri o Matangi.

92 te Taenga o Taane ki roto i Tawhirirangi ka purea e Ruatau ka uru ki roto i te Toi ongārangi i Kōnei a Taane.

92 Kote whakamāramatanga a Moihi ingā karakia o ngā Rangi tēnei.9.

93 Kote taenga o Taane ki Matingireia kia Io Matua. ki Rangiātea.

95 Ko te Whakamārama a Moihi i ngā Apa ongā rangi. A

97 Ko Taane anake i whai mana ki te uru ki roto i te Toi ongārangi. A

97 ngā tohutohu a Uru mā kia Whiro kia waiho atu ia Taane te whakahaere. (x)

98 te Haerenga o Whiro i te ara taepa kinga Rangitūhāhā. W

102 21 Hanuere 65 ka mea te Ura ote rangi e Moi whakahoroa ka kooaro ngā taewa i tā koutou mahi. Ka riri a Moihi i kōnei.?

105 Ka hoki iho a Taane me te wānanga i kōnei kia Tuanuku nei. 24 Hanuere 65.

106 Ka mau a Tūpai a Uruao ki ngā Pūtatara ka whakatangi. L

107 I karakia katoa te whānau a Papa i te taenga iho o Taane ki Rangitetau nei. M

108 ka tangohia e Whiro e Uru te kete ingā whatukura e 2: ka whakahē a Taane.

108 Ka meatu a Riwai me karakia maiano e koe ngā karaa te whānau nei. (Na)

109 Kote koiwi o ngā Pūtaratara nei koia tēnei.

109 Ka tono a Whiro a Uru kia hoatu te kete uruurutau kia rāua.

110 Kawehe a Roiho a Haepuru a Haematua i kōnei ia Whiro. H

110 Ka tūturu ngā take kino a Whiro i kōnei te whakaū e Whiro. Q

112 Ka tūturu te whakaaro o Whiro arā he Pakanga kia Taane mā. p.

113 Ka heke mai a Urutengangana ia Huakipouri noho ai. (1) Mō Iriiripua te take.

114 Ka mau te Rongo a Taane rātau ko ngātuakana i kōnei, ka whakaarohia e Taane ka ara te Pakanga i konei kia Whiro te tipua. (2)

116 Koia nei ngā ingoa o te Pakanga i mate ai a Whirote tipua i heke ai kite Reinga.

117 Koianei ngā tāngata nāna te Pakanga i te Paerangi. (3) Ngā mea hinga o Whiro mā hoki (4)

120 Koia nei ngā ingoa o ngā kāinga i heke ai a Whiro mā kite Reinga.

120 27 Hanuere 65 ka Poua nga Poutiriao i kōnei ki ngā wāhi o tuanuku o Rangi hoki o Hinemoana hoki. (5)

126 Ko te whakamārama o ngā manutapu tēnei. me ngā mea riro mai mō tēnei ao. (6)

126 Whakamārama a Moihi mō te kete o ngā whatu kura e 2 nei ia Whiro mā ra. (7)

127 Ko te whakamāramatanga o ngā kete o te wānanga ao Rangi i nāia nei (8)

129 Ka wehea ngā Whatukura e rua nei i kōnei.

129 29 Hanuere 65 te whakamārama a Moihi mōte Pātai a Pene mō ngā kapua i kōnei.

130 ka tikina te whānau arikirangi i kōnei i runga o Maunganui e noho ana.

134 30 Hanuere 65 Ka mea te Ura mā kia tere te whakawhaiti a Moihi i ngā kōrero, kariri a Moihi. 7 Aperira

138 ngā Rangi tēnei i kakae ai a Tāwhaki.

138 Horo iho ngā Huruhuru o te Tuara o Rangi i te wā i wehea ai ia e rātau kia papa nei pūai koia tēnei. (11)

139 te Whakamāramatanga i ngā wāhine atua a te whānau a Papa. 8 Aperira 65. tēnei. (12)

141 Ko ngā ingoa o ngā kete o te Wānanga e 3 nei ki ētahi tohunga. (13) me ngā tohutohu a Mohi kia māua.

143 te Whakamārama a Moihi mō te Whare wānanga me ōna whakahaere katoa. (14).

155 Koia nei nga marama o te tau, a te māori ake marama. (15)

156 Ko te tohutohu a Moihi mō ngā mahi wai whaia a te tangata. (16)

157 ngā Whakamārama a Moihi mō ngā kete me ō rātau whakahaere i kōnei (17)

159 15 Aperira 65 Te Pounga i Hawaiki a Whakaahu ki Hawaiki me ōna whakamārama anō. (18)

161 Ko te moenga o Taane ia Hineahuone me Hine tītama tēnei. (19)

165 17 Hanuere 65 (sic) ko ngā Poutiriao i Poua ki ngā takiwā mā rātau me ō rātau mana.

167 Na kote Pūtake o ngā Kapua ongā Kohu o ngā uira (20)

169 Whakamārama mō Whakarūaumoko tēnei. 18 Aperira 65. me ōna uri.

172 te Haerenga o Māui me ōna Hoa ki te Patu ia Hinetītama i Rarohenga. (21)

175 ko te mahinga ia Hineahuone tēnei. 20 Aperira 65. koia tēnei.

177 ko te tāpaetanga ia Hineahuone kia Taane, a ka hikaia e Taane kia Tikiāhua. (22)

181 Whakapapa o Taane me a rāua uri ko Hineahuone koia tēnei. (23)

181 Whakapapa o te Paara me ōna taina. (24)

182 te haerenga o Tāwhaki kite toro i tōna tipuna a Whaitiri. me te āhua ngā uri o te Tuna.

185 mā Tamawaho te mokokakariki 23 Aperira 65.

186 Ko te whakapapa o Rangi tamaku raua ko Whānui (25) me Rangi parauri rāua ko Kohurau. ko Whakarongoiata me ōna uri kei kōnei a Whātonga, a Rauru.

189 Ko te whakapapa o Roiho rāua ko Puhi kei te (26) kei kōnei ngatoroirangi a Kuiwai.

191 Urutengangana rāua ko Iriiripua tae mai kia Uenuku ake.

194 Tūpai rāua ko Hinemanuhiri me ō rāua uri tae mai kia Porourangi. Kahuterangi.

197 Ko Uenuku ia Rangaatoro. ko Ngatororirangi ia Hinewairangiko Rakaimoari ia te aohaeretahi. te aohaeretahime ōna taina.

197 25 Aperira 65 ko Taane mō āna uri, ka puta kia te Rangaatoro rāua ko Uenuku. kia Māui ma hoki. kia Tamaterā mā.

200 Uhengaariki kia Taaneroa, me te hokinga mai te Waipounamu ki

201 Whanganui, te kōrero o te hekenga o te Āwhiorangi kia Turi.

202 te riringa o Moihi kia riwai mā. me ngā kupu takaro anō. (28)

205 Māuitaha ia Haupatu ka puta kia Rongokakao ara atua tonu.

205 Māuitaha ka puta kia Ngāpuhi me ngā tāngata o te Rāwhiti. (29)

208 Māui Pae ka puta mai ki Tokerau ia Ira. ko Iwi tereroa ia Tamatea. (30) 26 Aperira 1865

209 Kahungunu ia Ruareretai. (31) Māui tikitiki ia Hineraumaukuuku kia Rongokako.

210 te Akaakamatua ia Wairangi tuakana o Taanematua ka puta kia Paikea. (32)

211 Riwai me whakaputa ana ekoe kia mārama mātau koi kore ōhoa i mōhio. (33)

215 Tauheikuri ia Tamataipunoa (34) 27/4/65 (date added in pencil) Ira ia Pipi kaputa kia Pakaariki me ōna uri katoa (25)

216 te Rongopatahi ka puta mai anō kia Tamatea (26)

216 ko Makawerau ia Pouroto ka hekemai kite Rāwhiti anō (27)

216 te whakahē a Moihi kia Riwai te Kukutai me kōrero tēnei. (28)

218 Maruwhakatipu ia Ngaputarawa kaputamai kia Uenukutiti he ara atua he tuakana nō Maika. (29) kia Kahukurawhitia mā nei. tae mai ki te whakamārama o Uenukutiti. 28 Aperira 1865. (pencil)

223 te aumatangi ia te ataataoterangi. Peeti 191.

223 ka puta kia Houmeanohotaumata. 29/4/65 (blue pencil)

227 Hurumanu ia Hinekokowai tae mai kia Pouheni ia Haakitai.

229 Taputearangi ia Kahutia terangi me tōna whakamārama anō o tēnei wahine. (30)

231 te Rerewa nāna nei te tuku o Wairarapa (31)

232 ko te tohutohu tēnei a Moihi kia māua mō te Pukapuka nei.

236 Whatiuatakamarae ia Hinerahiri meāna uri tae mai kia Kahukuramateroa kia Karimoi. (33) 2/5/65 (date added)

238 te kawa a taane ? ia Hokikau ka puta kia Rangaatoro kia Aparangi i moera ia Kupe. kia Rauru kia Whātonga (34)

239 Ko Hinewairangi ngā whakamārama mō tērā wahine. (35)

241 Tūtāmure tēnei me tōna taua ngaki mate mō tōna wahine (36)

244 (37) Tamataipunoa ia Tauheikuri tēnei me ōna uri.

245 te Anumairangi ia te Ataata oterangi me ōna uri kia Ohomairangi mā. (38) 5/5/29 (date added in blue pencil)

246 te kōrero mō Tamateamoa me Ranginui a Tamatea me te whare a Hamokorau.

250 Kupe ia Whakaeangarangi w 1-ka puta kia Ruawharo me ō rātau uri (40)

251 te whakapapa a Rihari Tohi mā Moihi i kīatu māna e whakapapa. (41)

253 te oriori mō Niniwa kite Rangi. (42)

256 7 Mei 1865 te whakamārama a Moihi mō Turiomata i moea nei e Rakaihikuroa ake. (43)

259 9 mei 1865 ka whakapapatia a Nukutaumaroro ia Mihimihi me ō rāua uri me te matenga o te Whatahoro i kōnei (45)

275 Tawhaitari ia Puwairangi me ōna uri katoa (46)

278 he wāhi kōrero anō i toe mō ngā uri a Rangi a Parauri i poua ki ngā ahorangi Puaroa o te Rā o te marama. (47) Uewhata ia Kahuitara puta mai kia Reretua me ōna uri. (48) ngā kupu whakamārama anō nā Moihi mō ngā Pūtake e hē ana.

291 te kupu poroporoaki a Moihi mōna mokopuna koia tēnei. (49)

292 e whakaatu a Moihi i te kōrero o Nukutaurua mō Paikea. (50)

294 me te kōrero mō Toi te Huatahi (51)

295 te whakapapa angā tāngata o te Rāwhiti mō Tamatea (52)

300 ngā whakamārama mō Kiwa me Hinemoana me ō rāua uri katoa (53)

315 Ko te Whakapapa a Moihi mō te Ruihi te Miha mō Raharuhi Tuhokairangi mō Pou Manihera. (54)

325 19 Mei 1865 te kōrero mō Mataora me Niwareka (55)

335 20 Mei 1865 Whakamāramatanga i te kōrero o Māui tikitiki o taranga tēnei. (56)

339 Whakamāramatanga mōte takapautanga ia Ruawharo ki roto o te kupenga a Uenuku. (57)

354 ngā Whakamārama o te Pūtake mai o te tangata i heke mai ai Irihia ki Hawaiki nei. (58)

362 Whakapapa o te Moana Tutaratai ia te Rorowhero me ōna uri katoa. (59) kia araiara kia te Whironui.

364 Tāwhaki ia Moua w 1 -me tōna putanga mai (60) kia Rongokako.

368 kote tohutohu a Moihi mō ngā kōtiro tēnei (61)

370 Māui Taha ia Haupatu W 1 -me te whakamārama a Moihi. (62)

371 Paikea ia Manawatini me ōna uri me ngā whakamārama (63) me te whawhai ki te Pukenui i Kaiuku nei.

374 Ka haere a Moihi, ka tono kia hoatu ā māua Pukapuka kia mahia e ia. (64)



APPENDIX C
Matorohanga-Best Ms (51)


Index compiled by Elsdon Best.

Dates Added from (51)

Pages
6/1/18655
Whare wānanga54 on, 181
Whare wānanga, Building of55
Whare wānanga, Karakia at opening6
Io, Karakia to6, 23, 59, 62, 76.
Twelve heavens, Names of 8
Twelve heavens, Occupants of8
Rangi and Papa9
Rangi and Papa, Offspring of9, 192
Rangi and Papa separated16, 21
7/1/6512
Rangi and Papa, Offspring rebel11
Kiwa11
Glow worm rep, first light11
8/1/6513
Birth items15
Moon items 15
Origin of snow, ice, etc.17
Āwhiorangi adze18, 29
12/1/6519
Kaupeka slain18, 20, 30.
13/1/6521
Ochre, pukepoto and papakura, Origin of.21
Tuhi mārei kura22
Tuhi mārei kura 22
Rangi, karakia to22
Divorce karakia25
14/1/6526
Tāne and Paia go to Maunganui26
Papa turned face down27
Whare-kura see Whare wānaga, Whare maire27, 30, 170, 173
Whiro II slain27
Mōrere, Origin of28
15/1/6528
Human sacrifice30
Mākutu, see whare maire30
Iho tamariki in ritual30
Whatu30, 38, 39, 48, 62
Whatu kura38, 48
Wānanga30, 38
3 kete of wānanga30, 38, 49, 61
Io31, 36, 73, 207
Spirits of dead at Whare kura31
17/1/6533
Turuma33, 57
Tama i waho33
Tāne seeks wānanga31 on, 37 on
Spirits of dead, W airua34, 67, 169
Fairies34
Whiro versus Tāne35, 43
Page
Rehua36
20/1/6538
Rangiātea38, 49
Apūtahi a Paoa: thunder39
Puru o Maahutonga19, 72
Pipi o te rangi39
Whiro te tipua40, 162
21/1/6543
25/1/6543
26/1/6544
27/1/6546
Pou tiri ao46, 47
Tātai arorangi46, 180
28/1/6547
29/1/6549
Sun, moon and stars 49, 180, 181
Star names50, 65
Tai o Ruatapu50
Uruao canoe ?group of stars51
Tamarerete51
Stars placed in heavens51
Origin of Day and Night51
Maruaroa, Divisions of year52
30/1/6552
7/4/6552
Origin of meteors53
10/4/6555
Whatu of whare wānanga56
Ahurewa of whare wānanga56
Tūāhu, where situated57
Ceremonies of the whare wānanga56 on
Ahi tapu generated58
Teaching in whare wānanga57 on, 61
Pure whare a whakatapu59
Sun worship, Survival of59
12/4/6561
13/4/6561
Months of Māori year63
14/4/6563
Matariki marks comm of year63
Mākutu, Whare maire63, 64, 150
Moon, Names of65
16/4/6565
16/4/6565
Tāne and Hine-tītama65
Hine tītama descends to Rarohenga66
Māui and Hine nui te Pō66
Pomum adonis, Origin of67
Ngerengere syn. mumutu69
17/4/6569
Page
Origin of clouds69
Origin of earthquakes72, 103
Origin of volcanoes72, 103
Origin of rain70
Toko of Rangi70
Kāhui kapua70
18/4/65 71
Ira tangata 71 on, 74, 82, 192
Ira atua73, 82, 192
Ahi kōmau72, 159, 163
Puru o Maahutonga72, 30
Hawk and fire 72
Fire72
Io as creator 73
Io, Names of73
Life. What it is73, 148
Uha, Search for74, 161
First woman, Creation of74
21/4/6578
One i Kurawaka78
Eels etc., Origin of79
Tāwhaki and matuku80
Tuna descends to earth79
22/4/6580
Eels, Names of81
Lizards82
Kauwae runga and Kauwae raro82
23/4/6588
Rā-wheoro house of learning88
Tutere-moana90, 132
Wharekohu burial cave on Kapiti90
Ngati Ira91, 110
24/4/6591
Rua-kapanga 93
25/4/6593
25/4/6595
Horouta canoe95, 101-41
Uhenga-ariki and Tāne-roa97-99
Tākitimu, arrival of97
Waitaha settle on Sth I.98
Tamatea and Turi at Whanganui99
Āwhiorangi given to Turi99, 100
Tiritiri o te moana99
Kupe99, 100, 126, 156
Toki of Hawaiki, Hui te rangiora, etc.100
Tākitimu calls at Rarotonga101
Tākitimu's voyage to N.Z. How steered101
26/4/65112
29/4/65 113
4/5/65121
Page
6/5/65127
Tutere-moana, Gen. from132
Mataora and Niwareka135, 167, 190
Paikea did not land in N.Z. but at Hawaiki135
Ira and Ruawharo at Hawaiki135
Hawaikian place names135
Honoura-Pikopiko-i-whiti at Hawaiki136
23/5/65 138
24/5/65142
Kai-uku fight143
Omakukara fight144, 147
26/5/65147
29/5/65152
Nights of the moon156
Toi and Kupe. Gen.156
Fishing. Winds158
Months of year158
Papa turned face down to Rarohenga159, 160
Whakarūaumoko 159, 160, 161
Ahi tahito161, 163
Ahi tipua163
Whiro (Death) assails man163
Celestial visitor, Uenuku-rangi164
Tamatea and Iwipupu164
Tattooing169, 178
Painting preceded tattooing and painting169
Spirits of dead separate to Rangi and Papa or to Rarohenga and heavens170, 173
Hawaiki-nui, Spirits of dead go to170, 173
Hawaiki-nui a whare kura170, 173
Mataora is tattooed170, 190
Spirits of dead come from Rarohenga to fetch spirits of dying 173
Ao tū roa, Te173
Whare māori 175
Clothing. Weaving176, 178, 179
Ruru and pekapeka. Why they are night birds177
Birds177
Whare maire see Whare Wānaga and whare kura 63, 64, 180
Tipi a Houmea (mākutu)180
Hine-moana181
Origin of sea weeds182
Origin of shellfish182, 183
Ruawharo and Takarita184
Uenuku slays Takarita184
Ira-kai-putahi, Origin of names184
Rua-wharo caught in net185, 189
Timu-whakirihia186
Timu-whakirihia bewitched Ruawharo and Tūpai187
Hape-ki Tuarangi187, 188
Whiti a Poutama189
Whare maire, School of black magic187
Page
Ruawharo, Paikea and Ira at Whangarā N.Z.189
Tū-tangata-kino 190
Hui-te-rangiora, one island190
Tattooing, Origin of191
Tattooing of women in olden times191
Road to spirit world closed191
Ira tangata is of ao, ira atua belongs to pō192
Life, Spiritual and physical of human192
Manawa ora of trees, stones192
Tiki of many names Not person193
Tiki and ure193
Papa of many names Not person193
Tāne of many names Not person193
Earthquakes193
Origin of soils195
ārai te uru195
Rua te pupuke and Tangaroa195
Fish195, 200, 201
Kites, Names of195?, 197
Sexes of trees, male & female198
How trees became fruitful198
Moana a Kiwa199
Shellfish199
Kōura, Crayfish 200
Winds201
Stones202
Sea and Land boundary held by rocks Rakahore203
27/5/65203
Gen. from Ngatoro-i-rangi through Hautu210
APPENDIX D

The Manuscripts

A list of the manuscripts located follows. Each is given a short title, a date and number of pages, where possible. The location is provided, together with a brief description of contents and origins and some discussion of the correspondences and connections among the many manuscipts here described. Those manuscripts which were located before 1970 and used in the original study of The Sources of The Lore of the Whare Wānanga (Simmons and Biggs 1970) are given first, and the numbering is then extended to the more recently available collection. The existence of some manuscripts not found before 1970 was only inferred at that time. Most of these have now been identified as existing in the total collection now available; others are referred to in the appropriate place, as the few not found were mainly earlier or later copies of texts now available, e.g., the original Engish text of the J. M. Jury manuscript (6), which is available as a translation only in Māori.

THE SMITH PAPERS ALEXANDER TURNBULL LIBRARY

These papers form part of the Polynesian Society's Papers deposited with the Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington. Numbers (1) - (6), (8) - (10) have been broken into sections, most of which are included with (52) and (53) as printer's copy for Smith 1913 and 1915. The parts not used are to be found in one volume labelled “Notes on the Lore of the Whare Wānanga”.

(1) 1910-11. Ms-Papers-1187-146, 1187-148, pp.134. Smith-Matorohanga. Smith holograph. This manuscript is a transcript in Smith's hand of part of (154) the Tānenuiarangi manuscript of The book of Te Matorohanga. Sections of the manuscript have been separated for publication in Smith 1913 and 1915 (52)(53), but may be identified by upper right-hand numbering prefixed by “Te m” or “Te M Sundry”. The manuscript contains a note, originally on the front, as follows: “Copied from p.73 et seq. of one of Whatahoro's book, on the side of which is written ‘ko te kape tēnei o te pukapuka a Moihi Te Matorohanga. Kua tukua ki a Tūpai [Hamilton]. Ko ētahi o ngā kōrero te toe anō ki te pukapuka tahito a Moihi 8 Feb. 1865’ written in Whatahoro's handwriting. All sealed with the seal of Tāne-nui-a-rangi” (This is a copy of the book of Moihi Te Matorohanga which was sent to Hamilton. Some of of the talks remain in the old book of Moihi, 8th February, 1865).

The manuscript was also prefixed by the following, in Smith's hand:

Note by Elsdon Best. The Matorohanga book was copied here at the Museum (Wellington) as also was Pohuhu's as the Täne-nui-a-rangi asked to get it published by the Government but of course it would be absurd to publish it twice. Stowell commenced the transcription but did not follow the original but altered it to his own dialect (Ngäpuhi). The Kahungunu form should be preserved. Oct 1911. Hence it was that I copied these sundry notes from Te Matorohanga's book with the intention of explaining Pohuhu's volume for printing.

Page 11 of (1) on the Horouta canoe was published in translation in Smith (1912:152) together with material from (35) and material from the Book of Pita Kapiti of Ngati Porou written down by the Rev. Mohi Turei Tangaroapeau and given to the Polynesian Society.

(2) 1910-11 Ms-Papers-1187-146, 1187-148, 66 pages. Smith-Pohuhu. The title page of the manuscript reads: Copied from Whatahoro's book [(153)] marked:

No. 1. Pukapuka whakapapa a Nepia Te Ika Pohuhu Ngāti Hine Pare. No. 1 genealogical book of Nepia Te Ika Pohuhu, Ngāti Hine Pare.

He whakapaparanga nō ngā kōrero me ngā mātauranga a ngā tūpuna, ki te hakanga o te rangi, o te whenua, me ngā mea katoa i te rangi, i te whenua, me ō rātau whakapapa. Ko ngā kaumātua nana ngā kōrero i tēnei pukapuka. A genealogical account of the talks and the knowledge of the ancestors, of the separation of heaven and earth, and their genealogies. The elders whose talks are in this book are:

Nā Nepia Pohuhu Wairarapa 1863 Nepia Pohuhu of Wairarapa 1863,
Rihari Tohi Wairarapa 1865 Rihari Tohi of Wairarapa 1865,
Paratene Te Okawhare Wairarapa, 1865 Paratene Te Okawhare of Wairarapa 1865, Moihi Torohanga Wairarapa 1869 Moihi Torohanga (i.e., Te Matorohanga) of Wairarapa 1869, Te Ohau Wairarapa 1859 Te Ohau of Wairarapa 1859, Te Waka Te Kawatini, Heretaunga 1876 Te Waka Te Kawatini of Hastings 1876, Moihi Ruatapu Tokomaru 1883 Moihi Ruatapu of Tokomaru Bay 1883, Tamahira Waruwarutu Wai Pounamu 1886 Tamahira Waruwarutu of the South Island 1886.

Written by Whatahoro Ngā Umutawa Wāhi o Māhi Tāone i te 1 Aperira 1863. Written by Whatahoro Ngā Umutawa, place in Masterton town on 1st April, 1863.

(This date refers to the session with Pohuhu; see the prologue to Pohuhu section in (111) the origin of (153)).

(2) corresponds in part with (153) the Tānenuiarangi volume of Pohuhu and (50) the Best-Pohuhu copy. The composite nature of its text could explain certain of the inconsistencies in the genealogies contained in the book. The pages are included with the manuscripts for the printer (Ms 1187-146.-148) but may be identified by the word “Pohuhu” written in red by Smith on the top right-hand corners of the pages.

(3) 1911 Ms-Papers-1187-148, pages 68-131. Smith-Whatahoro 1. This is a transcript in Smith's hand of what Smith called Te Whatahoro No. 1, but is not the same as that referred to as No. 1 on the title page of (2). The original manuscript from which (3) was copied is (15). It is separated into portions for inclusion in Smith 1913 and 1915, respectively, but the pages still bear the page numbers of the original. The text of (15) derives from a number of sources between 1890 and 1902. Whatahoro seems to have compiled it from Maori Land Court evidence, other manuscripts and conversations he had had with various elders.

(4) 1911 Ms-Papers-1187-123, pages 1-68. Smith-Whatahoro 2. This is said by Smith to be a transcript of the first 67 pages of what I have identified as (13), though it does not correspond exactly. A letter which is with manuscript (95) from S. Percy Smith to Te Whatahoro dated 29th December, 1910, lists the items he copied which correspond with the list of contents of what he called “Whatahoro's Second Volume”, which also correspond with the items included in (95) up to page 67. Smith comments that the last story on Wharepouri had not been completed. (95) contains items possibly added after December 1910, including further information about Te Wharepouri. (13) is a partial copy of (95). The Smith copy (4) has been made on serrated top pages from a foolscap pad. The material comes from a number of sources, including (73), which are dated between 1862 and 1902. Some of it was published in Chapters 7 and 11 of Smith 1915 as by Te Matorohanga. The sources of the unformation given in (95) are Moihi Torohanga, Mohi Ruatapu, Rutene Hamatu and Ngatuere Tawhao. A manuscript by Mohi Ruatapu of Ngāti Porou dated 10th February, 1871, is (107). Material by Rutene Hamatu and Ngatuere is also to be found in (100).

(5) 1911 Ms-Papers-1187-123, pages 14 including those numbered 1-12. Smith-Whatahoro 3. The first two (unnumbered) pages are “Questions on the Whare Wānaga and J. M. Jury's papers”, dated “Sept 25, 1911”. These are followed by page 1, which is headed, “copied from H. T Whatahoro's 3rd volume commencing at p. 301, the previous parts have all been copied by T. W. Downes into the genealogical volume [(7)] he gave to the Polynesian Society”. This suggests that the text from which this manuscript (5) was copied was added to the volume (7) after Downes copied it in 1908. A text copied by Smith on the Whare Wānanga bears the date of 18th March, 1868, and is attributed to Te Matorohanga.

(6) 1911 Ms-Papers-1187-148 pp. 1-15, Ms-Papers-1187-123 pp. 16-36. Twenty-five pages, plus two unnumbered slips, one of which is a Best holograph. Smith-Jury. As the numbering indicates, this manuscript is part of the same texts from which Smith copied (5). It contains traditional accounts of Kupe, Toi and Whātonga, and the moa. Most of this material is published in Smith 1915. Page 13 is in the form of a letter (in Māori) from the Englishman J. M. Jury to his half-caste son, J. A. Jury Whatahoro. The letter is dated 18th March, 1876, and is followed by a note by Te Whatahoro dated 1877. According to the letter and note, (6) derives from a narrative taken down in English by J. M. Jury from talks given by Te Apaapa o te rangi and others on the East Coast of the North Island on 21st February, 1840. It was copied in 1876 and given to Whatahoro. In 1877 it was translated into Māori by Thomas Young, a European who was Government interpreter in the Wellington District. After 1908, it was copied into Whatahoro's third volume. In 1911 it was copied by Smith as (6); this is the only version located. A translation of part of this manuscript concerning the moa appears in Smith 1911:55-9.

THE DOWNES MANUSCRIPTS

T. W. Downes copied from Whatahoro's manuscript books, or was given verbally by Whatahoro and others, the following:

(7) 1908 Ms-Papers-1187-126. 273pp. 20.3 x 32. 4 cm. Black ledger book. Downes-Whatahoro 3. This is a copy in Downes' hand of a book owned by Whatahoro (25). It consists mainly of genealogies given by, and copied from, books by Henare Potae Aute of Tokomaru Bay (Whatahoro married his daughter, who was the fourth of his seven wives), Te Apaapa o te rangi (see (6)), Mohi Ruatapu (95)(107) also of Tokomaru Bay, and others. It is dated between 1882 and 1893 and contains an index at the end compiled by S. P. Smith. It was copied by Downes in 1908.

(8) 1908 Ms-Papers-1187-148. 53pp. Detached pages of a ledger book numbered in reverse order 215-159. Downes-Matorohanga 1. Downes holograph. Signed on the front, “T. W. Downes, Wanganui”. This manuscript, which includes the story of Kupe, has the following note: “Given to me by a man who has made me promise not to divulge his name for fear that he might be accused of selling family secrets”. A partial translation by Downes is included. The whole is included with the copy for Smith 1915 (53).

(9) 1908 Ms-Papers-1187-159. 3 and 5pp. Detached pages of a ledger book numbered 30-36. Downes-Matorohanga 2. This manuscript, which contains the incantation for the Tākitimu canoe, was copied by Downes from one of Whatahoro's books, probably (23).

(10) 1908 Ms-Papers-1187-159. 38pp. Downes-Matorohanga 3. This manuscript, on notebook pages, is a copy of part of (23), a Whatahoro holograpah, and constitutes the immediate source for the material concerning Whātonga and Tara in Best 1919. The manuscript bears annotations by Best.

(11) 1908 Ms-Papers-1187-160. 3pp. Downes-Matorohanga 4. a karakia (prayer).

THE WHATAHORO MANUSCRIPTS

These are contained in the collection left to T. W. Downes by Te Whatahoro on his death in 1923, minus four volumes which Whatahoro had presented to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints in 1918; he became a member of the church in 1900 (Parsons 1990:214). The manuscripts contain material ranging in date from 1852 to 1913, much of it copied from Māori Land Court evidence or from other manuscript books or taken down at meetings. Manuscript (32), for example, was copied in 1913 from an original manuscript taken down at a meeting in Hiruharama, Wanganui, in 1907. The manuscripts are part of the New Zealand Maori Purposes Fund Board Papers (Ms-Papers-0189). The collection comprises two series, A and B. Series B was more recently transferred to the library and its contents are listed at the end from numbers (58) to (154).

(12) n. d. Ms-Papers-189-060 4pp. 31.5 x 20 cm. He matenga ēnei te pakanga a Tūtae-nui, whakatāuki (These are accounts of deaths, the war of Tūtae-nui, and sayings.) Material for publication, Whatahoro holograph; see (15) and (16).

(13) 1890-1904 Ms-Papers-0189-0102 195pp. 23 x 19 cm. Whatahoro holograph. Compiled from Land Court evidence, other books, coversations, etc.

(14) 1872-1903 Ms-Papers-0189-103 c86pp. 24.3 x 18.5 cm. Marbled exercise book. Whakapapa Tīpuna. Genealogies and Land Court material, East Coast. Whatahoro holograph.

(15) 1886-1903 Ms-Papers-189-104 195pp. 23 x 19 cm. Black exercise book. Mainly Whatahoro holograph.Whakapapa Tākitimu, Āraiteuru matenga o Ngāti Waitahā, karakia taua, te ngari o Tākitimu, Ngāti Mamoe (Genealogies of Tākitimu and Āraiteuru, defeat of Ngāti Waitahā, war magic, the chant of Tākitimu, Ngāti Mamoe.) This manuscript consists of informastion obtained from the South Island and Taranaki. Some sections are in a different hand. It includes information from Land Courts in Wanganui and Horowhenua and copied from Taranaki manuscripts such as Moriori traditions taken down at Taiporohenui from two Moriori in 1895 and copied in 1902. Smith published part of this material in 1915 Chapter VII with material from (6). Smith's Māori shorthand annotations on this manuscript [(15)] suggest that he copied it direct and was aware of its history. His statement, “It is nevertheless satisfactory to get the Māori account of the two canoes, ‘Rangihoua’ and ‘Rangimata’ and to find that they largely conform to the Moriori version” (1915: 162), cannot be substantiated.

The South Island material could be that refered to in the title of (2), (111) and (153) as deriving from Tamahira Waruwarutu in 1886. On pages 1 and 76 is the note in Whatahoro's hand, “kua kapia e au” (copied by me). See also (24).

(16) 1886 Ms-Papers-189-011072pp. 20 x 17 cm. Part of a marbled exercise book. Pukapuka whakapapa o ngā pakanga o te iwi Māori (Book of the wars of the Māori people). This is probably the book referred to by Downes in a letter he sent with (7), to S. P. Smith: “Whatahoro has one other book mainly of the various fights which he has promised to lend me”. This manuscript deals with fights on the East Coast.

(17) 1907 Ms-Papers-189-113. 26pp. 5 x 20. 5. marbled exercise book, pasted label No. 32. Komiti o Tāne H. P. Tunuiarangi, H. T. Whatahoro (H. P. Tunuiarangi and H. T. Whatahoro, the Committee of Tāne). The first page is headed Te wharau o Tāne July 15, 1907. Fragmentary notes of meetings of the committee of which Tunuiarangi and Whatahoro were secretaries.

(18) 1907 Ms-Papers-189-114. 46pp. 26.5 x 20.5. marbled exercise book with pasted label No. 33. Whakapapa Tīpuna Māori Genealogies of the Māori ancestors. Dated 27th March, 1907. Whatahoro holograph. The flyleaf has the words “Kapea tēnei pukapuka ki te pukapuka A. B.” (This book was copied into book A. B.). This manuscript consists of East Coast genealogies.

(19) 1892 Ms-Papers-189-115. loose pages from an exercise book. Whatahoro holograph. Various genealogies. Stamped “J. A. Jury, Assessor, Pineside, Wairarapa”.

(20) 1863-1888 Ms-Papers-189-116 32.5 x 21.5 black exercise book with pasted label No. 34. Nepia Pohuhu Whakapapa IIIB. A portion only of a book of genealogies. Whatahoro holograph in pencil. See also (44), (111), (119).

(21) 1898-1899 Ms-Papers-189-117. 20.3 x 16.3. Black exercise book with pasted-on label No. 35. Whatahoro holograph. A notebook containing songs, genealogies and Land Court notes.

(22) 1911 Ms-Papers-189-118 c50pp. 25.7 x 20.3. black exercise book, with pasted label No. 35. Whatahoro holograph. Songs and genealogies from various sources including Ngāpuhi and Ngāti Whātua. Copied from Whakatara 1911:48-115. The end page is stamped with the seal “Komiti Otāne nuiarangi: hiiri” (sealed Tānenuiarangi committee).

(23) 1904 Ms-Papers-189-120 20.5 x 16.5. marbled exercise book with pasted label No. 36. Whakapapa ētahi, me ētahi kōrero anō (Some genealogies and some more stories). This has probably been copied from another unidentified manuscript.

(24) 1864 and 1877. Ms-Papers-189-121 Section 1 pp. 91, 20.2 x 16 cm, Section 2pp. 101 19.5 x 15.8 cm. Pasted on label: Whakapapame ngā Pūtake na Riwai Kutai [sic] i Tuhituhi i tīmata a Paratene i konei (Genealogies and the Origins written by Riwai Kukutai Paratene began here). (See (111) and (153)). This manuscript consists of two sections bound together. The first section is headed “Te 18 Oketopa 1864. Ko te Pukapuka o te Hangahanga o te Ao. Hei whakamaharatanga o ngā kōrero o ngā Māori i ngā tau o tō tātau ariki o Ihu Karaiti” (18th October, 1864. The book of the building of the earth. To be a record of the traditions in the years of our Lord Jesus Christ), and ends with “Nā Riwai Te Kukutai Tuku iho ki āna uri, arā, ki a Hemi te Oka me ōna tuahine” (by Riwai Te Kukutai, left to his descendants, to James Teoka and his sisters). Most of the first section is an exact copy of the second section, which appears to be earlier. The second section starts abruptly at page 58 on the genealogy of Ruarangi. It continues to page 101, reverts to page 7, then continues to page 56. At the end of the first section are Maori Land Court notes dated Pāpāwai 1867-1877, and the pages used to cover the second section are dated 1876. Both sections appear to be the same holgraph, Whatahoro. Sections of this manuscript, pp.36-40 referring to Kupe and the octopus of Muturangi, were published by Best in a paper in which he identifies the origin in the Māori text as, “Nā Moihi Torohanga ēnei kōrero mō Kupe” (These stories of Kupe are by Moihi Torohanga [Te Matorohanga]) (1927:275), but he does not repeat this comment in the English translation.

(25) 1882-1893 Ms-Papers-189-122 c 150pp. 23.3 x 18.8. Pukapuka whakapapa, H Potaeaute, Tokomaru (Genealogy book of H. Potaeaute, of Tokomaru Bay). Whatahoro holograph. (7) is a copy of (25).

(26) 1897-1909 Ms-Papers-189-123 c200pp. 23.5 x 18cm. Whakapapatopia, ngā Pakanga, whakapapa Ngāitahu, etc. (Genealogies, wars, genealogies of Ngāi Tahu, etc.). Whatahoro holograph. Genealogies and notes from Ngāi Tahu, Taupō, Wanganui and Rangitāne.

(27) 1891 Ms-Papers-0189-126 23 x 18 cm Grey exercise book. Ropiha, Kāwana. Ngā kōrero o Mana. H. P. Tunuiarangi me te mataniho mō Wairarapa moana (Kāwana Ropiha, the stories of Mana. H. P. Tunuiarangi and Te Mataniho about Wairarapa Lake). November 1891. It also contains notes on the same subject by Whatahoro. See also (75), (95), (108) and (108).

(28) 1897-Ms-Papers-0189 122 c40pp. 23 x 18 cm. Black exercise book with pasted label No. 41. Ngā Whakapapa o ngā poutama ngā rohe o Ohoto ētahi (The genealogies of Ngā Poutama, and some of the district of Ohoto). See also (76), (97), (104), (105) and (116).

(29) 1899-1904 Ms-Papers-0189-129 21.7 x 6.3 cm. Marbled exercise book with pasted label No. 43. Whakapapa, kōrero pakanga, waiata, Mataitira Wharepu, Te hui ki Parikino (Genealogies, battle histories, songs, Mataitira Wharepu, the meeting at Parikino). (Parikino is on the Wanganui River).

(30) 1890-1895 Ms-Papers-0189-130 c60pp. 20.5 x 16 cm. Marbled exercise book with pasted label No. 44. Kōrero o Waikahemo a Tamahau mā mō ngā Whakapapa (Talk by Waikahemo, Tamahau and others about genealogies). See also (61) and (100).

(31) c.1892 Ms-Papers-0189-131 127pp. 23 x 18 cm. Marbled exercise book with pasted label No. 45. 2 Waiata tangi-Whakapapa Ngāi T ahu, Ngāti Kahungunu hoki, Rangitāne, Ngāti Raukawa, Ngāti Hikawera (two laments, genealogies of Ngāi Tahu, and Ngati Kahungunu, Rangitāne Ngāti Raukawa, Ngāti Hikawera).

(32) 1907 Ms-Papers-0189-132 pp.6. 26 x 20. 3 cm. Marbled exercise book, largely blank with pasted label No. 46. Te One Ngā Tūere/whakapapa Māori/Hiruharama, Whanganui (Māori genealogies by Te One Ngā Tūere at Hiruharama, Wanganui District). Whatahoro holograph copied March 24, 1913.

(33) 1873-1910 Ms-Papers-0189-133. 15.4 x 24cm. Marbled notebook. Pukapuka angāwhakapapa o Mahinarangi rere oma katoa o Ngāti Raukawa o Waikato o Taupo o Te Arawa (Book of genealogies from Mahinarangi down to all the tribes of Ngāti Raukawa, Waikato, Taupo and Te Arawa). Whatahoro holograph. See also (79), (108) and (133).

(34) 1907 Ms-Papers-0189-135 ppc.60 21. 7 x 16. 5 cm. Whakapapa ētahi, pakanga ētahi (Some genealogies, some battles).

(35) 1910 Ms-Papers-1187-160 Letter Whatahoro to S. P. Smith, August 1910 (see (54)). The text of this letter appears in translation by Smith in 1912:152.

(36) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-073. pp.174. 34 x 22. 5 cm. The first page is headed “kōrero o Te Whare Wānaga. 1862, 3, 4” (Lessons from the House of Knowledge, Vol. 1. 1869:62, 3, 4, 9). The second page is headed, “Ko te pukapuka e Kīia nei ko Tāne Nui arangi. He meaHīiri e taua Komiti” (The book which is called Tānenuiarangi. Sealed by that Committee). This is followed by a list of names of people contributing to the volume. The third page is headed “The Saying of the wise men”. Pages 4-7 are essentially identical with Pohuhu 1929:141-3, which is the published version of (153) and which Elsdon Best copied as (50). These pages have been bound separately into another spine on which is the title “Kōrero Whare Wānangatohunga”. Pages 8-9 are inserted pages from a ledger book, headed “Copy Pāpāwai, 2 Hanuere 1865”, and contain the oft-repeated (in these manuscripts) story of the beginning of the session of the Whare Wānanga in January 1865. Page 10 is headed “He kupu whakamārama mō runga i te Āhua o ngā tātai Kōrero i roto i te Pukapuka nei” (An explanation of the nature of the stories in this Book). The pages of the rest of the manuscript are numbered 1-162 and appear to contain the teachings of Te Matorohanga as in (154) and (51). It begins, “we were at Te Hautawa with Moihi Torohanga…”. The whole manuscript is in an unknown hand (possibly Kingi Tahiwi), with headings by Raumoa Balneavis, who oversaw the Pohuhu material through the printer for the journal of the Maori Purposes Fund Board, Te Wānanga. The material is copied from (153) and (154) and is similar to (50) and (51).

(37) n. d. Ms-Papers-0189-074 53pp. 33 x 21.2 cm. Bound into a cardboard cover. The cover is titled; “Te Whare Wānanga, 1865”. The first page is headed “Ngā Kōrero o te Whare Wānanga, 1865” (Lessons from the House of Knowledge). Further on, a page is headed “Unpublished part of Te Kauwae-Runga and Te Kauwae Raro-Ngā Kōrero tātai o Nehe. A Ngā Tohunga Ruānuku o Te Whare Wānanga o Aotearoa me te Waipounamu o Arapaoa” (Unpublished part of the Upper jaw and the Lower jaw [i.e., the divisions of learning], the genealogical stories of olden times. By the learned experts of the college of learning of the North and South Islands of New Zealand). The reverse of this page, on which the narrative starts, is headed, “Notes from Te Whatahoro M.S.S. Jan 2nd, 1865”. The material in this volume appears to be additional to (36) and contains the teachings of Te Matorohanga (154) and (51) although, in some sections, it is closely similar to material in (153) and (50). The copying of (36) and (37) was done under the mana of the Maori Purposes Fund Board between 1923 and 1929, i.e., after Downes gave Whatahoro's collection to the board and, from the L.D S. Church, Ngata recovered the four manuscripts: (153), (154), (111) and (64). The publication in Te Wānanga of the first texts copied from (153) as a memoir supplement “Te Whare Wānanga: (1) Nepia Pohuhu”, was in December, 1929.

Manuscripts held at the University of Auckland C-8

(38) 1876. 103pp. 32 x 20.5 cm. Whatahoro-Matorohanga 1. Moihi Torohanga tēnei pukapuka whakapapa (Moihi Torohanga's genealogy book). This manuscript is prefixed by a note in Whatahoro's hand, of which the following is a translation.

I start writing the talks of Moihi Torohanga in this book on this 15th day of July in the year of our Lord 1876, at Te Morere, in Te Manihera's potato storehouse. It is being copied by me to preserve it since the first books in which I wrote the talks of the year 1865, on 2nd January 1865, are falling apart. Therefore all those talks are [now] retained in this book. Those parts in blue pencil [ink] were inserted by myself, although they are not relevant to the main matters in the book. But the form of the words was written by me before.

It appears that, at some time, this book was seen by Elsdon Best, because pp.95-100, together with a section from (24), appear in Best 1927:273-6. The first 66 pages correspond with, but are not identical to, sections in (154) and (51). See also (39), (41), (64), (68), (91) and (103).

(39) 1865 120pp. 33 x 23 cm. Matorohanga. This manuscript is on unlined paper which appears to be the pages of a book which has come to pieces. The pages are now in seven fascicles pinned together with brass paper-clips. The whole is in Whatahoro's hand in lead pencil. The writing appears to be less well formed than in some of Whatahoro's other writings, e.g., (38). The first page is headed “Wairarapa/ Pāpāwai” and the text begins, “I te 2 ongā rā o Tīhema te tau o tō tātau Ariki o Ihu Karaiti 1865. ka pātai a Matiaha te Ura oterangi kia Moihi Torohanga, kia kōrero ia i ētahi kōrero a ngā Kaumātua…” (On the second day of December in the year of our Lord Jesus Christ 1865, Matiaha Te Uraoterangi asked Moihi Torohanga to tell some of the stories of the old people…).

It seems possible that this manuscript is, in fact, the original transcription of the talks of Te Matorohanga which Whatahoro refers to in 1876 (38) saying, “he pukapuka mahora noa iho ngā pukapuka tuatahi i tuhia ai e au ōna kōrero o te tau 1865” (The original books which were written by me containing his talks are quite mahora [?scattered, come to pieces]) (translation by Bruce Biggs).

Manuscripts (36), (37), (38), (39) all contain material which also appears in (154) and (51); any or all of them may be source manuscripts for the Tānenuiarangi Book of Te Matorohanga (154). Other material is found in (41), (64), (68), (85), (91) and (103).

(40) n.d. 13pp. 33 x 23cm. Uenuku a Houmatawhiti. This manuscript may be part of (38), Matorohanga, but the pages are numbered separately 1-13. It is in Whatahoro's hand.

(41) n.d. 4pp. 32 x 19.5cm. Matorohanga addendum. Whatahoro's hand in lead pencil on lined foolscap.Whakamaharatanga i ēnei ongā kōrero a Moihi, Kāhore i tuhia ki te tino Pukapuka (Remembered from talks of Moihi which were not entered in the real book). Refer (38), (39), (64), (68), (85), (91), (103) and (154).

(42) n.d. 114pp. 25.4 x 20.8 cm Hikawera Wiremu Mahupuku. A large notebook with pasted label reading, “He Pukapuka Whakapapa nama (2)” (Legends and Genealogies). This manuscript has the stamp “Komiti Tūpai 1902” on pages 51, 53, 54, 72 and 73. Only the genealogy appears to derive from Mahupuku, who was the Prime Minister of the Pāpāwai gathering. The other topics are, Io, Rangi and Papa, Tāne. Hinetītama, Māui, etc. See also (61).

(43) 1877 91 pp. 33 x 20.6 cm. Whatahoro-Rihari Te Hamatu. This large notebook with marbled cover bears a small pasted label “No. 2” and another larger label, “Whakapapa ēnei me āta tuhituhi” (These are genealogies, write them carefully). Page 1 has “A kura Mei 5 tau 1865” (Akura, 5th May, 1865), but the date of 21st January, 1877, is given a few pages further on. The whole of the text, in Whatahoro's hand, consists of genealogies. Rihari Te Hamatu's information is copied into (64) following the Te Matorohanga text, the copying dated to 1890-1.

(44) 1870 80pp. 32 x 20.2. Whatahoro-Nepia Pohuhu. This large notebook in Te Whatahoro's hand has two white labels pasted on the blue marbled front cover; the smaller bears the number “4”, the larger reads “Nepia Pohuhu ēnei Whakapapa tipuna” (Nepia Pohuhu these ancestral genealogies). The first page is headed “Whakapapa tipuna tēnei nā Nepia Pohuhu o Wairarapa 1 Pepuere 1870” (This is an ancestral genealogy by Nepia Pohuhu of Wairarapa, 1st February, 1870). Refer also (20), (111), (119), (50) and (153).

(45) 1909 c202pp. 26 x 20.5. Whatahoro A. This large notebook, in Whatahoro's hand, contains mostly genealogies. The back flyleaf has the following: “15 noema 1909 nā Whanganui nā Tuwharetoa nā Rangitāne ngā mea e toe ana kei kōnei, nā Ngāti Kahunu nu hoki ētahi iti nei me tiaki tonu tēnei pukapuka” (15th November, 1909, the remaining genealogies from Whanganui, Tuwharetoa and Rangitāne are here, together with a few from Ngāti Kahungunu. Look after this book well).

(46) 1906 6pp. 20 x 16.5 cm. Tūnuiarangi. An account by Major H. P. Tunuiarangi of the part played by him in the opening of a hui whakapapa at the house called Aotea at Pāpāwai, Wairarapa, on 7th May, 1906.

(47) Pre-1918 96pp. 32.2 x 20.2 cm. Raungaiti. This manuscript, in at least three different hands, is composed of the following numbered pages of a large notebook: 5-6, 23-54, 57-8, 61-4, 69-112 and 121-32. A note at the top of page 23 reads, “One of Raungauiti's books. Taumarunui [Raungaiti died in 1922]”. The style of the pasted number 18 on the same page indicates that the book was once in the possession of T. W. Downes. The book includes mostly genealogies, with some songs, and some recipes for various medicines.

(48) n d. 39pp. 20.5 x 19.5. Ngāti Apa and Whanganui. An exercise book containing genealogies and the account of a battle which, according to a note in English, is “the Tui fight at Tuke a Māui”.

(49) n.d. c 100pp. 32 x 19.5 cm. Meiha Keepa. A green-covered ledgerbook with the following on a white label pasted on the front: “Meiha Keepa whakapapa Rakaihikuroa waiata nā Tui, etc. Whitiotū Toka a kuku etc., etc.”.

Further Manuscripts in the Alexander Turnbull Library

(50) 1911q MS-1419 216pp. 35 x 21.5 cm. Bound in red. Best-Pohuhu. This is the transcript by Best of (153), one of the manuscripts sent by the Tānenuiarangi Committee to A. Hamilton at the then Dominion Museum.

(51) 1911q Ms-1352 210pp. 35 x 21.5 cm. Bound in red. Te Matorohanga. Title on the first page: “Book of Te Matorohanga, priest of the Whare Wānanga. The East Coast, New Zealand”. This is the transcript by H. M. Stowell (Hare Hongi) (pp. 1-89 typescript) and Elsdon Best (pp.90-210 Best holograph) of (154), one of the Tānenuiarangi volumes sent to the Dominion Museum. In a note, Best warns that the first 89 pages are not a strict copy of the original.

Further Smith Manuscripts in the Polynesian Society Papers, now within the Alexander Turnbull Library

(52) Ms-Papers-1187-146. Printer's copy, Lore of the Whare-Wānanga, Part 1, Te Kauae Runga. 20.3 x 31.3 and 20.6 x 31.5 cm with pad perforations at tops of pages. The two page sizes correspond to pages from (1) and (2).

(53) Ms-Papers-1187. 148. Printer's copy, Lore of the Whare-Wānanga, Part 2, Te Kauae Raro. Perforated top pages measuring 20. x 31.5 cm of (1) to (7). Interspersed with non-perforated pages of (8), (9) and (10). 20.3 x 32.4 cm.

(54) 1910 Ms-Papers-1187-160. 9pp. Whatahoro to S. P. Smith, 7th December, 1910. Headed Putiki o Whanganui, this letter contains the text of a chant used when fashioning a canoe, specifically the Tākitimu canoe (karakia tope, tārai waka… i te wā i tāraitia ai a Tākitimu). A transcript of the first three pages of this letter is included with (53) and this appears as pp.4-5 of Smith 1915. Pp.3-5 of (54) are transcribed into (53) and appear as pp. 189-91 of Smith 1915. The chant on pp.6-9 of (54) is transcribed in (53) and is published as pp.195-6 of Smith 1915.

(55) n.d. Ms-Papers-1187-160.28pp. Māhu. Smith holograph. Includes a printed map of Oceania. Two pages of notes in English and Māori followed by pp. 113-31 in Māori, headed “ko Māhu o Nukutaurua”. The text is printed, almost identically, in JPS, 35:95-109, where it is attributed (by Elsdon Best, the translator) to Te Matorohanga, presumably via Te Whatahoro. The story does not appear in (154) or (51), the Tānenuiarangi volume and copy of the Book of Te Matorohanga. Smith, and perhaps Best also, copied it from (15) p.175. See also (3), (55) and (58).
Further Whatahoro manuscripts in the Alexander Turnbull Library

(56) 1900 Ms-Papers-0189-124 c 100pp. 20.5 x 16.5 cm. Horowhenua-Wanganui. Whakapapa, Ngāti Raukawa, Muaupoko, Ngati Waiata [sic] (Whatahoro holograph, mainly taken down in Maori Land Courts at Horowhenua and Wanganui). Whatahoro acted for Muaupoko in the Horowhenua case of 1876.

(57) ?1863 Ms-Papers-0189-125 pp.c59. 23.5 x 19 cm. Te Aohau. Pasted label No. 40. “No 2 Pukapuka o ngā whakapapa o ngā tīpuna ētahi”. Page 3 is headed “Nā Te Aohau ēnei whakapapa he mea kōrero tūtaeka” (These genealogies are by Te Aohau which [he gave] from beginning to end). It includes genealogies by Rihari Tohi, Te Uruhinahina Raupora, Te Meihana and Moihi Torohanga. Some sections of the book are in an unknown hand, while others are in Whatahoro's hand. Apiata Te Aohau (also given as Te Ohau) was one of the tohunga mentioned in the foreword to (154) and included as a contributor to (153), where his contribution is dated to 1859. In the foreword to (111), the source manuscript for (153), Whatahoro says that he copied some material from the book of Apiata Te Ohau, an elder of Rangitāne and a very learned man. He further says that Nepia Pohuhu and Paratene Te Okawhare agreed to his genealogies being copied into the book in which Whatahoro had written their talks. This is dated to 1863. Te Aohau's contribution runs to 48 pages.

NEW ZEALAND MAORI PURPOSES FUND BOARD

Ms-Papers-189- Series B, Alexander Turnbull Library

Series B of the New Zealand Maori Purposes Fund Board (NZMPFB) collection was transferred to the Turnbull in February, 1982. As it is essentially a continuation of the library previously transferred, the material has been added on to the end of Series A. Each item has been given a running number. The first line of the description contains any numbering appearing on the volume, together with a physical description of the item. Following this is a copy of the contents note attached to each volume by Whatahoro, or a transcription of the first lines of the volume. (An English translation has been added to this and the system extended backwards into Series A; descriptions by D.R.S.) The series contains two parts: the remaining volumes of notes by Te Whatahoro Jury sent to the board by T. W. Downes, and the four volumes presented to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints by Te Whatahoro and later reunited with his collection given to T. W. Downes together with a series of correspondence files (Preliminary catalogue notes supplied by the Alexander Turnbull Library).

Ms-Papers-189 Series B(58) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B001 370pp. A1, 33cm, half-bound in brown calf dark, green boards. Māui Tikitiki tēnei; Mataaho tēnei; Kupe tēnei; Toi tēnei; Me tīmatate pukapukai tēnei maahu tēnei(Māui, Kupe, Toi, but begin the book with this, Maahu) (A.T. Ngata annotations). See (3), (15), (55), (58), and Best JPS 35:95-109.

(59) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B002. 116pp. 1, 33 cm. Marbled paper covers. Pukapuka o te komiti o Pukengaki (Book of the Pukengaki committee).

(60) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B003. 200pp. 2, 33 cm, half-bound in brown calf, dark green boards.Whakapapa katoa tēnei (These are all genealogies).

(61) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B004. 108pp. 33 cm. Black. No. 3. 1. Ngā Kōrero o te whaka mō Hinana. 2. ngā whapa (sic) a Hikawera ia Piripi. Nā Taiwaho ētahi, nā Āporo ētahi, nā Tamahau ētahi, Iriatara ētahi (1. The stories of the reply to Hinana. 2. The genealogies of Hikawera to Piripi. Some by Taiwaho, Aporo, Tamahau, Iriatara). See also (121), Aporo, (30) and (61), Tamahau, (42), Hikawera, (42).

(62)n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B005. 194pp. 33 cm. Marbled boards. Ka nui te whakapapa kei kōnei me tēra motu hoki me titiro ēnei kōrero katoa koi wareware (Many genealogies are here and of that island, look at all these talks lest they be forgotten). Native Land Court, Otaki.

(63) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B006. 382pp. 33 cm. A1, half-bound in calf, blue boards. Pukapuka whakapapa. He nui ngā whakapapa kei kōnei (Genealogy book. Many genealogies are here).

(64) 1896-1901 Ms-Papers-0189-B007. 348 and 63pp. 33 cm. half-bound in brown calf, blue boards. 4. Spine title Ancient Maori History. Pukapuka whakapapa a Moihi te Matorohanga o Ngāi Tahu o Wairarapa (Genealogical book of Moihi Te Matorohanga of Ngāi Tahu, Wairarapa). Followed by the information from Rihari Te Hamatua, dated as having been copied on 7th February, 1890-1. pp.63. See(43)dated to 1865 and 1877. (64) Stamped “Rongokako Kaunihera” (Rongokako Council). One of four volumes given to the L.D.S. See (154), (38), (39), (41), (68), (85), (91) (103) and (51).

(65) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B008. 84pp. 5, 33 cm. Marbled paper covers. Taiawhio, Harihina me ētahi atu whakapapa o Kauihi mā (Taiawhio, Harihina and some other genealogies of Kauihi and others).

(66) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B009. 276pp. 6, 33 cm. quarter-bound in maroon, blue boards. Whakapapa nā Paewai me ngāpakangakei kōnei nā Ngāti Porou ētahi me ngā waiatapai, Toi kai rakau ētahi (Genealogies by Paewai and some of the wars, some by Ngati Porou, good songs, some of Toi kai rakau).

(67) 1910 Ms-Papers-0189-B010 183pp. 6, 33 cm. quarter-bound in maroon, blue boards. Na Tamakehu tēnei pukapuka whakamārama mō ngā kōrero a Te Tairāwhiti i tuhia e H. T. Te Whatahoro i te tau 1910 i te kaupeka o te ahoturuturu, arā o Hūrae (This book is Tamakehu's explaining the talks of the East Coast, written by H. T. Te Whatahoro in the year 1910 in the month of ahoturuturu, that is, July).

(68) 1865 Ms-Papers-0189-B011. 46pp.7, 24 cm. Black leger, silver clasp. Ko te tangata nāna ēnei whakapapa i kōrero mai ko Moihi te Matorohanga, he mea tuhituhi i Pāpāwai i te Hautawa i te tau o tō tātau A riki o Ihu Karaiti 1865… (The man who spoke these genealogies was Moihi Te Matorohanga, written at Pāpāwai at Te Hautawa in the year of Our Lord Jesus Christ 1865…). See also (38), (39), (41), (64), (68), (85), (91), (103), and (153).

(69) 1869 Ms-Papers-0189-B012. 1034pp. (850 blank). 7, 27 cm. Letterbook. Kape tēnei nō ngā Reta ki ngā Minita Māori o te Kāwanantanga mō ngā whenua o Wairarapa. Nā Te Makarini tēnei pukapuka mā Te Manihera Rangi Takaiwaho o Pāpāwai 3 Hepetema 1869 (This is a copy of a letter to the Maori ministers of the Government about the Wairarapa lands. Letter by MacLean to Te Manihera Rangi Takaiwaho of Pāpāwai, 3rd September, 1869).

(70) 1861 Ms-Papers-0189-B013. 350pp. 8, 25cm. 8, Vellum. Pukapuka whakapapatīpuna. Me kape ngā mea e hangai ana ki te tino pukapuka nui takato ai kia mārama ai (Book of ancestral genealogies. Copied from the things put in the real big book to remain and be seen).

(71) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B014. 262pp. 33 cm. half-bound in brown calf, black boards. 1.Whakapapa ētahi. 2. Pākanga a Manaia mā. 3. Pākangaētahiēnei (1. Some genealogies. 2. War of Manaia and others. 3. Some other wars). See(16), (98) and (119).

(72) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B015. 280pp. (137 blank). 33 cm. half-bound in brown calf, black boards. Pukapukanāte Whānau a Iri Te Kura o Waipiro tēnei;kei kōnei a Ngāti Kahungunu a Whanganui hoki a Tūwharetoa anō iti nei (Book of the birth of Iri Te Kura of Waipiro; here also are some of Ngati Kahungunu, Whanganui and a little of Tūwharetoa).

(73) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B016. 134pp. 9, 24cm. half-bound in maroon, black boards. Ngāwhakapapa o Te Taha kia Tamatea me ōna uri tēnei, e puta ana kia Hori Taha. Me ngā kōrero o Te A raw a me te matenga o Raumati(Genealogies of Te Taha to Tamatea and his descendants ending in Hori Taha. The stories of [the burning of] Te Arawa and the death of Raumati. In the hand of Kirihona H. Taha, and Te Whatahoro. Best has made a note on page 134: “Ka ngaro i te moa” (Lost like the moa). See Smith 1915:261-2 for a similar text copied by Smith as (4) from Whatahoro's volume 2, (95), which is attributed to Te Matorohanga.

(74) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B017. 10pp, 20 cm. Maroon paper covers. No. 1. Otumauma pukapuka. Otumauma book.

(75) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B018. 96pp. (46 blank). 10, 33 cm. Marbled paper cover. 1. Whakapapa mō ngā take katoa o Rangitāne o Ngāti Kahungunu hoki. 2. Pūtake mai o te Pō rāno (sic) ētahi kei kōnei. 3. ētahi o ngā kōrero mo Wairarapa moana. Me tuhi tēnei ki tā Paratene Patakenga mea (1. Genealogies and all things of Rangitāne and Ngāti Kahungunu. 2. Origin of the Night and other items. 3. Some of the stories of Lake Wairarapa). This was written from the speech of Paratene Patakenga.

(76) 1897 Ms-Papers-0189-B019. 96pp. (72 blank). 11, 33 cm. Marbled paper covers. Rarangi ingoa tēnei Ohutu Poraka, 1897 Kooti tēnei (List of Ohutu Block names 1897 court). See (28), (97), (104), (105) and (116).

(77) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B020. 168pp. 11.20 cm. Marbled paper covers. Whakapapa ēnei me ngā kaupeka me ētahi kōrero e pā ana ki Io me ngārangi tūhāhā (These are genealogies, months and other talks touching Io and the heavens).

(78) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B021. 160pp. (120 blank). 12 and no4, 23 cm. Marbled boards. No. 4 pukapuka o ngā whakapapa o ngā tīpuna (No. 4 book of ancestral genealogies).

(79) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B022. 144pp. (134 blank). 12, 24 cm half-bound in maroon, black boards. Ngāti Tūwharetoa me ētahi atu whakapapa atu o Ngāti Maniapoto o Waikato hoki (Ngāti Tūwharetoa and some other genealogies of Ngāti Maniapoto of Waikato). See also (33), (133) and ?(72).

(80) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B023. 266pp. 13, 32cm. Maroon boards. Whakapapa Māui tikitiki. A2 (Genealogy Māuitikitiki. A2).

(81) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B024. 100pp. 14, 20 cm. Marbled paper covers. Whakapapa, ngā matenga (Genealogies, the deaths).

(82) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B025. 192pp. 15, 33cm. Marbled boards. 1. Whakapapa o Tūwharetoa i a Puhaorangi o Paikea. 2. Te wehenga o Rangi o Papa mā. 3. Tangaroa o Māui, o Rata, o Ruatapu. 4. Whakapapa pūtake. 5. Uenuku ēnei kōrero. Me kape ēnei kia pai ai te takato kia Mārama ai (1. Genealogy of Tūwharetoa from Puhaorangi to Paikea. 2. The separation of Rangi and Papa. 3. Tangaroa to Māui, Rata, Ruatapu. 4. Origin genealogy. 5. These talks of Uenuku. Copied so they may be seen).

(83) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B026. 128pp. 15, 20 cm. Marbled paper covers. Pukapuka mō ngā whakapapa tawhito tēnei me whakawhiti kia pai (Book of ancient genealogies rearranged).

(84) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B027. 172pp. 16, 20 cm. Black soft cover. Te Whatahoro whakapapa (Te Whatahoro genealogies).

(85) 1864-1900 Ms-Papers-0189-B028. 288pp. (192 blank). 31. 16, 31 cm. quarter-bound in brown, maroon boards.Whakapapa. Mei o te tau 1900 nā Moihi Torohanga. He mea tuhi nā H. T. Whatahoro i te tau 1864 (Genealogies. May of the year 1900 by Moihi Torohanga. Written by H. T. Whatahoro in the year 1864) (starts again at p.31). See also (38), (39), (41), (64), (68), (85), (91) and (154).

(86) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B029. 160pp. (100 blank). 17, 20 cm Marbled paper covers. Whakapapa tēnei (These are genealogies).

(87) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B030. 86pp. 18, 22cm. Black paper covers. Waiata te nuinga whakapapa ētahi (Mostly songs, some genealogies).

(88) 1898 Ms-Papers-0189-B031. 102pp. 18, 33 cm. marbled paper covers. 1. Kōrero o Whakaihuwaka o Whanganui. 2. Kei kōnei anō ngā whakapapa o Whanganui. 3. Ngākōrero o ngā Pākehā o te taenga mai ki Niu Tireni hei ētahi. 4. Pakanga ētahi me āta trotiro rawa ēnei kōrero (1. Talk of Whakaihuwaka of Whanganui. 2. Here are the genealogies of Whanganui. 3. The stories of the Pākehā, of the coming to New Zealand. 4. Some fights). The matter consists mainly of the the Turangawahi case in the Land Court from 21 st March, 1898, and other cases to do with Te Ati Hau a Paparangi of the Whanganui River. See (104) and (155).

(89) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B032. 150pp. 19, 23 cm. Marbled boards. 5. Waiata oriori whakapapa hoki nō Ngāti Kahungunu nō Rangitāne. He kōrero pakanga ētahi ki Mōkai hoki (5. Lulluby and genealogy as well of Ngati Kahungunu and Rangitāne. A story of fights at Mōkai).

(90) 1873 Ms-Papers-0189-B033. 74pp. (30 blank). 19, 33 cm. Marbled paper covers. 1873 Whanganui. Aperaniko Tuhi ariki me ngā rohe o Tuhi A tiki me ngā kai hoki (1873 Whanganui. Aperaniko Tuhi Ariki, the boundaries of Tuhi Ariki and the foods).

(91) 1865 Ms-Papers-0189-B034. 288pp. (252 blank). 17. 20, 33 cm. Brown calf, black boards. Pāpāwai, 2 Hanuere 1865 (Pāpāwai 2nd January, 1865). Written in pencil. Seal inside cover, “Pāremata o Te Iwi Māori o A otearoa me Te Waipounamu” (Parliament of the Māori tribes of the North and South Islands of New Zealand). The text begins; “I noho mātau ko Riwai te Kukutai ko Moihi Te Matorohanga…” (We were with Riwai Te Kukutai, Moihi Te Matorohanga…).

(92) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B035. 112pp. 21, 20 cm. Marbled paper covers. Whakapapa raupatu ētahi o ngā kōrero o tēnei pukapuka (Genealogies of conquest and some of the stories are of this book).

(93) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B036. 188pp. 21, 33cm. Marbled boards. Nō Tauwhareparae tēnei pukapuka me ngā whakapapa (This book and the genealogies are by Tauwhareparae).

(94) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B037. 204pp. (104 blank). 22, 33 cm. Marbled boards. Kooti ki Otaki, ki Pōneke kei kōnei ētahi whakapapa me ngā pakanga hoki (Land Court at Otaki, Wellington, some genealogies and the wars as well).

(95) 1867-96 Ms-Papers-0189-B038. 180pp. 23, 33 cm. Marbled boards. 1. Ngākōrero o te whakawā o Hiko mā. 2. Te matenga o Maruhaiaturaki. 3. Kōrero o Tangaroa o Māui hoki. 4. Te whitinga a Uenuku i te kupenga a takai ai a Ruawharo ki roto rāua ko tūpai. 5. Timuwhakirihia ia ko a Ruaw haro a Tūpai. 6. Rutene ngā Tuere kōrero Pukio tae atu otaupuaro. 7. Te whakapa [sic] o Pukio tēnei a Wi Hatana. 8. Pakanga nō Moihi Torohanga i kōrero. Nā Pahoro Te Tio-kōrero mō Wairarapa moana. 9. Te wawahanga o Haeretahi kia Tūrei mā. 10. Ngā whakapapa o Ngāti Kahungunu. 11. Te tangi a te wharepouri mō Nuku i Nuku taurua (1. The story of the judgment of Hiko and others. 2. The death of Maruhaiaturaki. 3. The story of Tangaroa and Māui. 4. Uenuku's lifting of the net in which Ruawharo and Tūpai were rolled. 5. Timuwhakairihia, Ruawharo and Tūpai. 6. Rutene Ngātuere story of Pukio down to Otaupuaro. [see also 7]. 7. The genealogy of Pukio of Wi Hutana. 8. Wars spoken by Moihi Torohanga, Pahoro Te Tio-story of Wairarapa Lake. 9. The division of Haeretahi to Tūrei and others. 10. The genealogies of Ngāti Kahungunu. 11. The tangi of Wharepouri for Nuku at Nukutaurua). The above is the front label and outlines some of the contents. Some of the early sections, pp. 23-33, are attributed to Moihi Torohanga and dated to 1867. These are followed by material drawn from various sources dated up to 1896. Copied by Whatahoro as (13) and Smith as Whatahoro Volume 2 (4). The material is drawn from (15), (16), (73), (119) and other manuscripts which have not yet been clearly identified. (Pages 68-73 are by Wi Tamihana, 12th May, 1888. Others are by Mohi Ruatapu (see (107), Rutene Hamatu, Ngatuere, Tawhao. Notes on p. 149 are dated 14th January, 1896)).

(96) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B039. 191 pp. 25, 33 cm. Maroon black boards. Whakapapa nā P. Te Kira ngā waiata maha (Genealogy by P. Te Kira, many songs).

(97) 1897+ Ms-Papers-0189-B040. pp. 377. 26, 33 cm. Maroon, black boards. 1. Rarangi ingoa Ohotu kei kōnei. 2. Whakapapa anō kei kōnei. 3. Kōrero pakanga kei kōnei. 4. NāNgāpuhi ētahi ngā pakanga o Tairāwshiti ēnei katoa (1. List of the names of Ohotu (68) for the probable original of this section from the 1897 Land Court). 2. More genealogies. 3. Stories of the wars. 4. Some of the wars of Ngāpuhi with the East Coast.

(98) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B041. 100pp. 27, 33 cm. black boards. Te whakawā o Huraunuiarangi Te Naruaua mā. Ngā whakapapa ētahi Te whakawā o Hinana a Manaia ētahi ki kōnei Nā Wi Pere ētahi whakapapa. (Judgment of Huraunuiarangi Te Naruaua and others. Some genealogies. The judgment of Hinana of Manaia, some of it. [?Ngāti Pukenga of Pakikaikutu, Manaia, Whangarei]. some genealogies by Wi Pere.

(99) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B042. 28, 33cm. Marbled paper covers. 2. Kahungunu tēnei whakapapa (2. This genealogy is of Kahungunu).

(100) 1891 Ms-Papers-0189-B043.80pp.28, 33cm. Maroon boards. 1.Whakapapa o Kahukuraw hitia 1891. 2. Ngāroherohenga o Wairarapamoana. W i Tamahau me a Rutene Hamatua me ngātuere. 3. Ngā kōrero a W i Hutena o Otaupuaroaro whakawā. 4. Te Wahanga ongā moni o Wairarapa moana (1. Genealogy of Kahukurawhitia 1891. 2. The boundaries o Lake Wairarapa. Wi Tamahau, Rutene Hamatua and Ngātuere. 3. The story of Wi Hutena about the Otaupuaroaro judgement. 4. The division of money for Lake Wairarapa). See (75).

(101) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B044. 74pp. 29, 33cm. Blackboards. 1. Whakapapa o Ngā Poutama. 2. Whakapapa o Ngāti Kahungunu. 3. Nā Te Meihana Tahihi ēnei whakapapa. 4. Ngā pakanga mō Tara ki tai me Tara ki uta (1. Genealogy of Ngā Poutama. 2. Genealogy of Ngāti Kahungunu. 3. These genealogies by Te Meihana Takihi. 4. The war about Tarakitai and Tarakiuta).

(102) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B045. 184pp. 29, 33 cm. Black boards. Poutama ake tēnei pukapuka whakapapa (This genealogy book is from Poutama). See (28).

(103) 1865 Ms-Papers-0189-B046 1865 114pp. 30, 26 cm. half-bound in brown, dark green boards. 2 Hanuere 1865 Kanoho mātou kite Hautaw a wāhi o Pāpāwai a Moihi Torohanga a Riwai Te Kukutai A Matiaha Mokai a Ihaka Whatarau a Terei, a Pene, ahau a Te Whatahoro meā mātou wāhine… (2nd January, 1865, we were staying at Te Hautawa, a place at Pāpāwai, Moihi Torohanga, Riwai Te Kukutai, Matiaha Mokai, Ihaka Whatarau, Pene, me, Te Whatahoro and our wives…). On page 96 the information appears in pencil also in Whatahoro's hand but less well formed; it starts: 2 Hanuere 1865 I te Hautawa o Pāpāwai ia mātou ko Riwai te Kukutai ko Matiaha Mokai ko Ihaka Whatarau ko Pene ko Terei ko ahau Te Whatahoro meā mātou wāhine i tēnei ka toru…. See also (7), (38), (39), (41), (64), (68), (85), (91), (103) and (154).

(104) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B047. 374pp. 33cm. Black boards. 1. Rarangi ingoa Ohotu. 2. Ngāhea o Ohotu. [(see (97)and (76), the latter dated to 1897]. 3. Kōrero whakaihuwaka [see (88), (155)]. 4. Whakapapa a Topia. 5. Whakapapa a te Rangihuata. 6. Whakapapa a Hakiaha(1. List of names of Ohotu. 2. The shares of Ohotu [see (97) and (76)]. 3. Story of Whakaihuwaka. 4. Genealogy of Topia. 5. Te Rangihuata genealogy. 6. Hakiaha genealogy.

(105) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B048.91pp. 39, 33cm. Marbled paper covers. Ohotu tēnei pukapuka whakauru me ngā whakapapa anō o ngā take me ngā rohe o aua take anō (This book is of Ohotu, joining together the genealogies, claims and boundaries of that place). (See (76), (97), (104).)
The following volumes have no added numbering.
(106) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B049. 238pp. 27 cm. Black boards. Vol. 1 Names inserted in Recommendations for Crown Grants.

(107) 1871 Ms-Papers-0189-B050. 106pp. 24cm. Marbled boards. He pukapuka whakapapa nō ngā tīpuna Māori Pepuere 10 1871 (Genealogy book of the Māori ancestors 10th February, 1871). It has a note: “This book was given to me by the late Major Ropata Wahawaha. The first part alone, up to page 100 being of value the authority being Mohi Ruatapu of Tokomaru, an old tohunga. nothing that follows page 100 is to be depended on. W. L. Williams”. (See (7), (25), (95) and (107).)

(108) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B051. 112pp. 33 cm. Black boards. Whakapapa ēnei katoa Ngāti Kahungunu o Ngāi Tahu, o Whanganui Ngati Tūw haretoa hoki o Waikato anō. Ngā kōrero o Wairarapa moana hoki (These are all genealogies of Ngāti Kahungunu of Ngāi Tahu, of Whanganui Ngāti Tūwharetoa and Waikato) (See (79), (108). The stories of Wairarapa Lake. (See (75), (95) and (100).)

(109) 1878+ Ms-Papers-0189-B052. quarter–bound in maroon, dark green boards. Whakaaro o Komiti o Pāpāwai me ngā whakapapa anō. 2. Pitihana ki te kāwanatanga. 3. Whakaaro mō te Uruokakite. Te taenga mai o Kerei o te Hīana 78 Ngā take i Whakatokotoria kia kērei. He matenga ētahi. Rohe Wairarapaētahi. Ngā pā ngā whare o Ngāti Moretu. 4. Rohe o Wairarapa moana (Thoughts of the Pāpāwai committee and the genealogies. 2. Petition to the Government. 3. Thought about Te Uraokakite. The arrival of Grey at Te Hiana, '78. The matters put before Grey. Some fights. Some Wairarapa boundaries. Pā and houses of Ngāti Moretu. 4. Boundaries of Lake Wairarapa). (See (100).)

(110) 1892 Ms-Papers-0189-B053. 190pp. 33cm. half-bound in maroon, dark green boards. Book No. 2 1892 Native Land Court Otaki. Ag 20 to - Tamati Tautuhi.

(111) 1862+ Ms-Papers-0189-B054. 191pp. 33cm. quarter-bound in maroon, dark green boards. 1. Pukapuka, Apiata Te Aohau, whakapapa[pp.49],Nepia Pohuhu, Whakapapa [pp.71],Paratene Te Okawhare. Whakapapa [pp.71] (1. Book, Apiata Te Aohau, genealogies, Nepia Pohuhu, genealogies, Paratene Te Okawhare. genealogies). One of four books lent to the L.D.S. Stamped with the stamps “Rongokako Kaunihera and Tānenuiarangi”. Inside the front, a text is dated to Ngāumutawa, Māhitāone 4 Mei 1862. Ngā Umutawa (Masterton, 4th May, 1862), which starts with the following:

I kapea mai ai e au ngā kōrero o tēnei Pukapuka i roto i te pukapuka a Paora, ko aua kōrero o roto o tānapukapuka, A piata te A ohau he kaumātua tēnei nō Rangitāne he tino tangatamohio hoki i kīa ana. A i te tau 1863 kanoho mātau ko Nepia Pohuhu This statement is signed Tiaki Turi Ngā Karu o Peeti, the early name of John Jury Te Whatahoro. I copied the stories in this book from the book of Paora, and those stories in his book of Apiata Te Aohau an elder of Rangitāne a truly learned man so ko Paratene te Okawhare ki ngāumutawa me Aperahama me Hera te Ata, me Ihaka Whatarau me Ripeka me Hare taka me te moanaroa me te Ropiha te akau rāua ko Kararaina. Ka Tīmata ahau kite tuhituhi i ngā kōrero a Nepia a Paratene hoki, i te otinga o ā rāua kōrero i au te tuhi katoa, ka whakaatūria e au ēnei whakapapa a Apiata te Aohau nei…. it is said. Now in the year 1863 we were staying with Nepia Pohuhu, Paratene te Okawhare, at Ngā Umatawa, together with Abraham and Hera Te Ata, Ihaka Whatarau and Rebecca, Hare Taka, and Ropiha Te Akau and Karanaina. I began writing the talks of Nepia and Paratene and, at the end of their talks when I had finished it all, I placed these genealogies of Apiata Te Aohau here….

See also (57) which also contains material dated to 1863 from Te Aohau. (20), (119) and (44) dated to 1870 have material from Nepia Pohuhu, as well as (153), which derives from this volume, (111) and (50).

(112) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B055. 112pp. 20cm. No cover. Whakamaharatanga. Memorial.

(113) 1845-1911 Ms-Papers-0189-B056. 294pp. (132 blank). 19cm. Black boards. I a Noema 1845… 1911 (November 1845… 1911). Notes, whakapapa, events, etc. ?1845 from J. M. Jury Ms.

(114) 1908+ Ms-Papers-0189-B057. 140pp. 18cm. Black boards. Te Whatahoro ?Journal 1908-.

(115) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B058. 119pp. 20cm. Black boards. Whakatāuki a te Maōri (Proverbs of the Maori). H. Fletcher.

(116) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B059. 156pp. 20cm. Black boards. Whakapapa, ngā kōrero o te Hui ki Pōneke, ngākōrero Ohotu me ngā whakapapa kei kōnei (Genealogy, talks of the meeting at Wellington, the talks of Ohotu and the genealogies). See (76), (97), (104) and (105) for other material on Ohotu.

(117) 1892 Ms-Papers-0189-B060. 190pp. 33 cm. half-bound in maroom, dark green boards. Book 4a Native Land Court, Masterton, 24th September to 28th October. Nelson, 3rd to 9th November. Tamati Tautahi (see (110)).

(118) 1901 Ms-Papers-0189-B061. 100pp. 33 cm. Marbled boards. Kaiapoi 7 Maehe 1901 Kaiapoi, 7th March, 1901. Minutes. See also (24) for other South Island material.

(119) n. d. Ms-Papers-0189-B062. 80pp. 33 cm. Black boards. 1. Na Manaia whakapapa. 2. Tamahau e toe ana. 3. Hemi Hepanaia whakapapa. 4. Nepia Pohuhu whakapapa (1. Genealogy by Manaia. 2. Remains of Tamahau [see (30), (61), (100)]. 3. Hemi Hepania genealogy. 4. Nepia Pohuhu genealogy). See (20), (44), (50), (111) and (153).

(120) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B063 1871. 152pp. 18 cm. Black boards. Ākuwhata 14 M 1871, Nā Te Whata (August 14, M 1871, by Te Whata). Genealogies, notes, etc., together with notes by John White. (White acknowledged Whatahoro's providing material in volume 1 of The Ancient History of the Maori (1887:vii), where he also lists Nepia-Po-huhu, Paratene-oka-whare, Apiata, Rihari Tohi, Karauria-Nga-whare, Waka tahu-ahi, Paora-Te-kiri, Ihaka-Nga-hiwi, Harawira-Ta-tere and John Jury-Te-Whatahoro, of the Takitimu.)

(121) 1909 Ms-Papers-0189-B064. 156pp (90 blank). 20cm. Black boards (loose sheets stuck to cover). He Pukapuka whakapapa nā Āni Āporo, Kereitāone, Ākuhata20, 1909 (A genealoogy book by Āni Āporo, Greytown, 20th August, 1909). Notes by Whatahoro. See (61) and (121).

(122) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B065. 14pp. 33. 24 cm. No covers. Whatahoro, genealogy.

(123) 1892 Ms-Papers-0189-B066. 104pp. 24. 20cm. No covers. 1892 he matenga kei ana kōnei hei tuhi (1892 A fight written here). Whatahoro's hand.

(124) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B067. 92pp. 33.23cm. No covers. Ngā whakapapa o Parakiere Ngāti Kere (Genealogies of Parakiere of Ngāti Kere [Porangahau]). Whatahoro holograph.

(125) 1900 Ms-Papers-0189-B068. 114pp. 20cm. no covers. 19. 2. 1900 Pāpāwai Minutes of meeting together with genealogies. Whatahoro's hand.

(126-52) n.d. Ms-Papers-0189-B069-95. Various sizes, notebooks. Te Whatahoro notebooks, 27 in all, with miscellaneous information, much of it relating to the L.D.S. Church.

(153) 1907 fMS-191 766pp. (546 blank). 39cm. half-bound in brown calf, brown boards. Nama 1. Pukapuka whakapapa a Nepia Te Ika Pohuhu, Ngāti Hine Pare (Number 1. Genealogical book of Nepia Te Ika Pohuhu, Ngāti Hine Pare). Spine title: Ancient Māori History. Komiti o Tānenuiarangi seals. Inside the cover a list of contributors is given as in (50) and (2). The text is dated: “Ngāumutawa Wāhi o Māhitāone, 1 Apera (sic) 1863”, and starts: 1 tīmata ai a Nepia Pohuhu te kōrero ki au koia tēnei āna kōrero. E tā, e whata, whakarongo mai ki āku kōrero kia koe; kua oti i au te kōrero ngā kōrero ki ō tuakana taina…. (Ngā Umutawa, place in Masterton, April 1, 1863. Nepia Pohuhu began his talks to me and these are they: Sir, Whata, listen to my talks to you; I have completed speaking of the stories of your elder and younger brothers…). A similar passage appears in manuscript (l11) at page 48, all the previous part having been copied from Paora's (?Paora Te Kiri) book. Written in ink pencil. See (111), (20), (44) and (119) for material recorded as being by Pohuhu. (111) and this volume [(153)] were two of the four volumes lent to the L.D.S. Church. (153) is the origin of both (50), the Best-Pohuhu volume, and of (36) published in 1929 in Te Wānanga as a memoir supplement.

(154) 1907 fMS-190. 426pp. 39cm. half-bound in brown calf, brown boards. Ko te Kape tēnei o te Pukapukaa Moihi Te Matorohanga Kuatukuakia Tūpai [Hamilton]. Ko ētahi o ngā Kōrero kei te toe ano ki te pukapuka tahito a Moihi (This is the copy of the book that was sent to Hamilton. Some of the stories remain in the old book of Moihi). Spine title: Ancient Māori History. Komiti o Tānenuiarangi seals. The book is prefaced with the story of the gathering of the books, the Tānenuiarangi committee and the notice sent out. The text begins: 2 Hanuere 1865. Te Hautawa, wāhi o Pāpāwai o te takiwā o Wairarapa i roto i Aotearoa i te Motu o Niu Tireni. I pātai a Matiaha te Ura oterangi. …(2nd January, 1865, Te Hautawa, a place of Pāpāwai in the district of Wairarapa in Aotearoa in the island of New Zealand. Matiaha Te Uraoterangi asked…). All text written in pencil. See (64), (24), (38), (39), (40), (41), (57), (68), (85), (95), and (103) for other material attributed to Te Matorohanga and the copies made (1), (8), (9), (10), (52), (53), (37) and (51). (64) is the immediate origin of (154), and these two were two of the four books lent to the L.D.S. Church, the other two being (111) and (153).

(155) 1867-98 Ms-Papers-0189-B098. 18pp. half-bound foolscap, fasicules. 1. Ngāti Porou ēnei kōrero whakapapa. 2. Te Rauna whakapapa. 3. Nā Te Wairere 24 Tīhema 1867. pp.10. 4. Pitihana 1898 Whakaihu poraka (1. These genealogical talks are Ngāti Porou. 2. Te Rauna genealogy. 3. By Te Wairere [in pencil] 24th December, 1867. 4. Petition 1898 Whakaihu block [?Whanganui]). Refer (88), (104).

N.Z.M.P.F.B. FILES REFERRING TO WHATAHORO'S MANUSCRIPTS

Ms-Papers-0189-B158 Mr T. W. Downes Te Whatahoro Manuscripts
Ms-Papers-0189-B158/3 Mr T. W. Downes Te Whatahoro Manuscripts
Ms-Papers-0189-B160 Māori Ethnological Research Board
Ms-Papers-0189-B161 Manuscripts -general
Ms-Papers-0189-B166 List of Mss sought to be published
Ms-Papers-0189-B170 Te Matorohanga Duplicate pp. 1-76
Ms-Papers-0189-B172 Mohi Ruatapu
Ms-Papers-0189-B173 Te Wānanga-memoir supplement. Te Whare Wānanga. i) Moihi te Matorohanga
Ms-Papers-0189-B174/1 Nepia Pohuhu 1863 (transcribed by Kingi Tahiwi)
Ms-Papers-0189-B174/3 See volume 97 (154)
Ms-Papers-0189-B174/4 Mr Balneavis' minute in Record Book of parcels, Nepia Pohuhu-Book 2

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